26.02.2024 /

EASE Activity Report 2023

EASE Activity Report 2023

In 2023, EASE embraced several opportunities, and sustained its position as the main European advocate for energy storage in the continent’s energy landscape. EASE policy activities in 2023 focused on the revision of the European Electricity Market Design and demonstrated the association’s ability to foster collaboration on a wide range of topics involved with Europe’s latest reform of its energy system.

Here are some of our achievements in 2023:

  • The launch of the Energy Storage Coalition with other energy stakeholders further demonstrated energy storage’s relevance to the wider cleantech sector.
  • The Energy Storage Global Conference saw stronger participation than ever, a testament to the successful collaboration between EASE and key stakeholders. The ESGC is approaching its first decade and is now the flagship event for the energy storage industry to showcase its vitality to policymakers.
  • EASE policy activities in 2023 focused on the revision of the European Electricity Market Design and demonstrated the association’s ability to foster collaboration on a wide range of topics involved with Europe’s latest reform of its energy system.
  • While the European Commission focused largely on finalising ongoing initiatives and implementing adopted legislation, it remained committed to addressing the challenges stemming from the Russian invasion in Ukraine and the subsequent energy crisis. EU’s overarching objectives were to strengthen the resilience of the energy system and limit strategic dependencies.
02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

06.12.2023 /

Webinar: Energy Storage Innovations

Webinar: Energy Storage Innovations

On 6 December 2023, the European Steel Technology Platform (ESTEP) and the European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) gathered participants for a webinar “Energy Storage Innovations”.

Webinar Speakers:

Carbon-Clean Technologies GmbH

Carbon-clean provides energy-intensive industries with on-demand, renewable process heat from our thermal storage. The system stores energy as high-temperature heat at 1,200 °C and is charged with renewable energy from locally sited renewables or via the grid. The system is discharged to provide a continuous stream of high-temperature process heat (hot air or steam) to industrial processes. Our modular energy storage achieves capacities of 100 MWh to 5 GWh and achieves energy efficiencies of 95 %. Contact: Robert Pfab, robert.pfab@carbonclean.de

UNDA Engineering

Unda Enginering Inc. was founded in 2016 with the aim of developing solutions for a sustainable industry. We developed a thermal battery under the Calor-e brand. The system can be used on the grid as a “demand shifting product” or off the grid with direct coupling with renewables such as solar and wind. The main highlights of the system are its modularity, fast response capabilities for charge and discharge, full recyclability and low environmental footprint and its compatibility with conventional heat transfer fluids. The system is designed as 1 MWe modular units that can be arranged for different user profiles with a versatile range of charge up to 0.5 MWe/h and discharge up to 1 MWe/h. Contact: Emin Selahattin Umdu, esu@undaengineering.com

CLERENS

CLERENS is a leading public affairs and communications consultancy based in Brussels. CLERENS works with clients and the European Institutions to build a better a policy framework in a wide range of areas including energy, environment, and mobility. We offer a unique combination of technical expertise and coalition-building experience to transform innovative ideas into structured RD&I projects. CLERENS assists its clients in the end-to-end acquiring of EU Funds (from monitoring, concept assessment to proposal writing) such as Horizon Europe and Innovation Fund and CLERENS also provides services on the implementation of EU Projects. Contact: Martin Bracken, m.bracken@clerens.eu

 

 

Webinar recording:

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

25.10.2023 /

Empowering Energy Intensive Industries: Unleashing Energy Storage Innovations

Empowering Energy Intensive Industries: Unleashing Energy Storage Innovations

On 24 October 2023 International Federeration of Industrial Energy Consumers (IFIEC) and the European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) gathered participants for a webinar “Empowering Energy Intensive Industries: Unleashing Energy Storage Innovations”.

Webinar Speakers:

Carbon-Clean Technologies GmbH

Carbonclean provides energy-intensive industries with on-demand, renewable process heat from our thermal storage. The system stores energy as high-temperature heat at 1,200 °C and is charged with renewable energy from locally sited renewables or via the grid. The system is discharged to provide a continuous stream of high-temperature process heat (hot air or steam) to industrial processes. Our modular energy storage achieves capacities of 100 MWh to 5 GWh and achieves energy efficiencies of 95 %. Contact: Robert Pfab, robert.pfab@carbonclean.de

UNDA Engineering

Unda Enginering Inc. was founded in 2016 with the aim of developing solutions for a sustainable industry. We developed a thermal battery under the Calor-e brand. The system can be used on the grid as a “demand shifting product” or off the grid with direct coupling with renewables such as solar and wind. The main highlights of the system are its modularity, fast response capabilities for charge and discharge, full recyclability and low environmental footprint and its compatibility with conventional heat transfer fluids. The system is designed as 1 MWe modular units that can be arranged for different user profiles with a versatile range of charge up to 0.5 MWe/h and discharge up to 1 MWe/h. Contact: Emin Selahattin Umdu, esu@undaengineering.com

Kyoto Group

Heat accounts for two thirds of industrial energy consumption. Traditionally, nearly all of it is based on fossil fuels. Kyoto Group’s Heatcube, a thermal energy storage (TES) solution, provides a sustainable and cost-effective alternative by capturing and storing abundant but variable energy from sources such as solar and wind. Founded in 2016, Kyoto Group is headquartered in Oslo, Norway, and has subsidiaries in Spain and Denmark. Contact: Camilla Nilsson, camilla@kyotogroup.no

 

Webinar recording:

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

11.10.2023 /

Business Case and Taxonomy of Behind-the-Meter Battery Energy Storage Systems in Europe

Business Case and Taxonomy of Behind-the-Meter Battery Energy Storage Systems in Europe

Behind-the-meter (BtM) Battery Energy Storage Systems (BESS) are pivotal in the European Union’s pursuit of ambitious climate goals and renewable energy integration. Co-located with technologies like solar photovoltaics (PV), they empower consumers and contribute to peak-shaving and load management. However, realizing their full potential necessitates a clear regulatory framework.

As BtM BESS deployment continues to expand, addressing existing barriers is imperative. These challenges include among others fair remuneration, net metering, complex tax structures, and inadequate integration of energy storage in system planning.

By addressing these challenges and providing the necessary policy support, the European Union can fully leverage BtM BESS and BtM BESS+PV solutions. This approach not only promotes a sustainable and resilient energy system but also empowers consumers to actively participate in the energy transition.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

27.09.2023 /

Thermal Energy Storage

Thermal Energy Storage

EASE has prepared a paper that aims to shed light on the numerous benefits of thermal energy storage (TES) by providing an overview of technologies, inspiring projects, business cases, and revenue streams. Policy recommendations are also discussed.

With renewable energy projected to constitute 69% of the EU’s electricity mix by 2030, TES emerges as a crucial solution to address energy demand, grid stability, and decarbonization challenges. As Europe steers towards a carbon-neutral future, TES is positioned to bridge the gap between the current energy landscape and the renewable energy targets set for 2030 and 2050.

TES technologies are set to play an integral role in Europe’s transition to renewable energy dominance, offering longer-duration storage solutions and reducing reliance on fossil fuels. As the EU pursues climate neutrality and energy security, TES deserves greater recognition and integration into energy policy to support the EU long-term energy goals.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

27.09.2023 /

Technical Contribution on the Annex XV Restriction Report for PFAS

Technical Contribution on the Annex XV Restriction Report for PFAS

In January 2023, a group of EU member states collectively submitted a proposal for restrictions to the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) concerning per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS).

ECHA describes this proposal as the broadest in history, and conducted a consultation on the proposed restrictions to gather input from stakeholders, including on missing applications, and to explore possible exemptions when non-PFAS alternatives are not available. PFAS play critical roles in multiple energy storage technologies which are essential to the transition towards decarbonised energy.

Due to these dependencies, finding PFAS alternatives is challenging and EASE recommends derogation periods of at least 13.5 years with a review clause to allow research and industry to develop alternatives. The reply detailing this recommendation is available on our website.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

13.07.2023 /

Call for Evidence Feedback on the EU Climate Target for 2040

Call for Evidence Feedback on the EU Climate Target for 2040

EASE has prepared a reply to the European Commission’s Public Consultation on the EU Climate Targets for 2040 that aims to gather inputs on the EU’s intermediary climate targets for 2040 by 24 June 2023. The Call for Evidence Feedback will inform a detailed impact assessment in view of drafting a law proposal.

The EU Climate Law requires the European Commission to propose a 2040 climate target in 2024. The Commission recognises that the 2030 and 2050 targets need to be supported by an intermediary target to improve their chances of being met. The objective is to provide certainty for stakeholders to meet the requirements and inform their strategic and investment decisions in light of a reaffirmed EU commitment to the fight against climate change. With the COP29 of 2025 closing in, European policymakers and Member States are keen to communicate their renewed climate ambitions, and to strengthen the regulatory framework for consistent measures to be implemented towards achieving the EU’s climate goals.

EASE believes it is paramount to support the highest-ambition climate targets for 2040 (“more than -90% emissions reduction”). This should be done for two reasons.

Firstly, by adopting very high targets, the EU will strengthen its fight against climate change and smoothen the transition to a sustainable, decarbonised energy system. Such targets attract investments that facilitate the deployment of renewables and energy storage solutions necessary for a decarbonised Europe.

Secondly, the adoption of a high-ambition intermediary 2040 target will effectively provide greater incentives for Member States to achieve the 2030 and 2050 climate targets. A low-ambition intermediary 2040 target may potentially be used as a reason to delay needed investments to meet the 2030 targets.

Importantly, these intermediary targets must be rooted in scientific evidence and take into account the potential economic, social, and technological implications. Conducting thorough research and impact assessments is necessary to ensure citizens’ and Industry’s trust in European Union policymakers.

 

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

31.05.2023 /

The Electricity Market Design Revision Proposal

The Electricity Market Design Revision Proposal

The Russian invasion of Ukraine has emphasised that relying on fossil fuels imports for the European Union’s energy system can have dramatic consequences on energy security and the economy at large. More than ever, energy independence, security of supply, sector integration, and decarbonisation are guiding policymakers’ actions.

Although decarbonising the energy sector is crucial, most system flexibility is currently provided by fossil gas: this has led to an insecure energy system and forced the European Union to depend on energy imports. The resulting price spikes and gas shortages have prompted quick action by European Union policymakers.

On March 14, 2023, the European Commission released a proposed reform of the Electricity Market Design, which, while somewhat limited in scope, has the potential to significantly impact the energy storage sector. EASE strongly supports this proposed revision, as it strikes a good balance between public involvement and market-based mechanisms and aims to maintain the current framework focused on day-ahead and intraday markets while introducing some changes. However, policymakers require guidance to make the most of this opportunity to change the electricity market framework.

To achieve the 2030 and 2050 climate and energy targets, the regulatory environment must be adjusted to ensure long-term investment signals and adequate deployment of flexibility and energy shifting capacity.

EASE outlines below its key position on how to enhance the proposal and make non-fossil flexibility a central component of the new decarbonised energy system.

This document is based on the previously published EASE position paper on the Electricity Market Design revision and the EASE reply to the European Commission’s public consultation.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

14.04.2023 /

EMMES 7.0 - March 2023

EMMES 7.0 – March 2023

EASE and LCP-Delta are pleased to announce the publication of the seventh edition of the European Market Monitor on Energy Storage (EMMES).

The Market Monitor is based on the most extensive database of European energy storage projects. The database of over 2,600 projects includes detailed data on current installations by customer segment (residential, C&I and front-of-meter) across 24 European countries, future projects and forecasts to 2030. The database is accompanied by a report which outlines key EU legislation, drivers and barriers for 12 core countries. The report looks at the electrical energy storage market, providing data and analysis across 3 market segments (residential, commercial & industrial and Front of the Meter) with updated project data based on StoreTrack database and a forecast towards 2030.

Key takeaways from the EMMES 7.0:

  • Demand for storage is bigger than ever: about 4.5GW of new installations in 2022 and an even more positive outlook of > 6GW for 2023.
  • The European-wide energy crisis, national government support, growing Front of the Meter project development pipelines, and an overall positive future policy direction on a EU-level are accelerating this demand. At the same time the sector will have to face increasing challenges in the face of supply-chain constraints, grid connection bottlenecks, skilled workforce constraints and rising costs.
  • Great Britain and Germany are leading the market in Front of the Meter and Behind the Meter respectively, but with growing interest in Europe more countries will join them create a much more diverse deployment landscape by 2025.

 

Recording of the EMMES 7.0 launch webinar “How will the new electricity market design shape the energy storage sector?” is available here.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

22.02.2023 /

EASE Activity Report 2022

EASE Activity Report 2022

Last year was a significant one for EASE and for the Energy Storage sector.

As soon as the curtains closed on 2022, it was clear that it marked a pivotal year for Europe, sending shock waves across the globe. Safeguarding our Energy Security has become an urgent priority, underscored by geopolitical instability and the increasing pace of the climate crisis.

In this rapidly evolving landscape, Energy Storage is key to achieve an independent and secure access to energy, whilst paving the way for a carbon neutral economy. As we look back on this past year, we can confidently state that we have gained substantial ground on this issue. At EASE, we are determined to continue to forge this path towards a promising future.

Here are some of our achievements in 2022:

  • The REPowerEU Action Plan, addressing Europe’s dependance on Russian fossil fuels, enabled EASE to highlight energy storage’s essential role in ensuring security of supply.
  • A joint collaboration with Breakthrough Energy, SolarPower Europe and WindEurope brought forth a fruitful awareness campaign called “Energy Security Needs Energy Storage”, which benefited from a strong outreach on both the public and policy-making scene.
  • EASE, together with 10 other European and national associations, representing key energy stakeholders across the EU, called for More Energy Storage Provisions in Fit for 55. It is currently pending approval, following planned trilogue negotiations.
  • In 2022, we achieved record attendance from all corners of the world at the Energy Storage Global Conference, jointly organized with the European Commission Joint Research Centre.
  • Ten organisations became EASE members, adding to our diverse and innovative membership base.
02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

14.02.2023 /

Energy Storage: a Crucial Technology in the Transition to a More Sustainable Energy System

Energy Storage: a Crucial Technology in the Transition to a More Sustainable Energy System

The European Commission’s Public Consultation on the electricity market design revision aims to review the current electricity market design and identify areas for improvement that could support the integration of renewable energy sources, while ensuring security of supply and keep prices affordable for consumers.

The Commission recognises that the electricity market design must adapt to accommodate the growing share of renewable energy sources in the energy mix, and to enable the integration of technologies able to provide flexibility and energy shifting, such as energy storage; at the same time, in the view of the geo-political developments of the past year, European policymakers and Member States felt the urgency to tie together the several emergency measures that have been published in order to protect consumers from supply disruption and high electricity prices, and to provide a coherent framework that could address these issues should they arise again in the future, without sacrificing decarbonisation efforts.

Energy storage is seen in the publication as a crucial technology in the transition to a more sustainable energy system: as the current electricity market design in Europe has not yet fully integrated energy storage, there is a need for a more comprehensive and flexible framework to enable its deployment. The Commission’s public consultation aims to address this issue and explore ways to incentivise the deployment of energy storage. EASE ensured that its policy recommendations (as outlined in our recent position paper) to foster the business case and integration of energy storage are heard by the European Commission, and can become part of the upcoming Electricity Market Design proposal.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

08.12.2022 /

The Electricity Market Design Revision: Enabling energy storage for a carbon-neutral future

The Electricity Market Design Revision: Enabling energy storage for a carbon-neutral future

On 7 December 2022, over 200 participants attended webinar on electricity market design revision and joined the discussion on how it can enable energy storage for a carbon-neutral future. Representatives of EASE Policy team presented the latest EASE policy analysis paper The Electricity Market Design Revision and shared a list of changes identified to ensure a renewable-based and secure energy system. Speakers from Iberdrola, CellCube, Fluence and Enel X  joined to discuss the topic. 

In the past year, Europe has witnessed climate change-related crises, security of supply issues caused by rapid geopolitical developments, and unexpected price spikes that disproportionately fall on industries and consumers. A principal reduction of fossil fuel consumption is essential to solve these challenges: a new electricity market design enabling energy storage is critical to achieving this.

 

In the webinar recording find answers to how do we make sure energy storage can support achievement of carbon-neutral security of supply, help reach renewable targets, while having sufficient revenue streams to operate in a competitive market.

 

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

30.11.2022 /

The Electricity Market Design Revision

The Electricity Market Design Revision

EASE has finalised a paper on the upcoming electricity market design revision, highlighting how energy storage can enable a carbon-neutral future.

More than ever, energy independence, security of supply, sector integration, and decarbonisation are guiding policymakers’ actions. The electricity market design needs to do justice to consumers and reap the benefits of low-cost green solutions. It is key to leave behind polluting fossil fuels, whose influence is dominating the price of electricity. Most system flexibility is currently provided by fossil gas: this has led to an insecure energy system and forced the European Union to depend on energy imports. There needs to be a change in paradigm, with the Clean Energy Package as a foundation, where energy storage becomes a critical part of the energy system.

Legislators should look into securing new investments via long-term guarantees while maintaining short-term dispatch based on competitive markets as at present. In particular, EASE identifies a list of changes as needed to ensure a renewable-based and secure energy system.

The paper aims to answer:

  1. How can the market design reform support energy security?
  2. What can be done to maximise renewables’ penetration?
  3. What is the role of gas “peakers” in today’s energy system? What can be done to replace them with greener and cheaper solutions?
  4. How to attract long-term investments in energy storage?
  5. How to ensure deployment of longer duration energy storage while maintaining a level-playing field?
  6. How to achieve forward-looking system planning for a cost-effective energy transition?

 

Webinar recording available!

On 7 December 2022 EASE hosted a webinar on electricity market design revision and discussed how it can enable energy storage for a carbon-neutral future together with a panel of speakers from Iberdrola, CellCube, Fluence, Enel X. Watch the recording here.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

17.11.2022 /

Energy Security Needs Energy Storage

Energy Security Needs Energy Storage

Breakthrough Energy, the European Association for Storage of Energy – EASE, SolarPower Europe and WindEurope are once again joining forces to stress the importance of energy storage for Europe to achieve energy security.

After drafting a join open letter co-signed by more than 20 organisations April 2022, the four organisations are launching an awareness campaign to stress the importance of energy storage not only for the achievement of energy security but also for the fulfilment of the energy targets and a reduction of citizens’ energy bills.

Supporters of the campaign:

DNV Logo GRAVITRICITY Malta Logo
Sungrow Logo

 

You can also join the campaign! Send an email to e.cirule@ease-storage.eu to be featured among the supporters of the Energy Security Needs Energy Storage Campaign!

 

Check out the campaign infographics:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

24.10.2022 /

2024 Ten-Year Network Development Plan Framework Guidelines

2024 Ten-Year Network Development Plan Framework Guidelines

EASE has prepared a reply to the European Union Agency for the Cooperation of Energy Regulators (ACER)’s Public Consultation.

The process has commenced for the current cycle of the Ten-Year Network Development Plan, the pan-European electricity infrastructure development plan, developed jointly by ENTSO-E and ENTSOG. Following the revision of the Trans-European Networks for Energy Regulation, ACER has a role in developing framework guidelines to set the boundaries of the process for the ENTSOs. EASE welcomes this public engagement and opportunity to submit comments to ensure a fair development process.

EASE calls for the need for the ENTSOs to work jointly in developing scenarios, to take into consideration all climate and energy targets (binding and non-binding), and to consult energy storage throughout this cycle.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

15.07.2022 /

How Much Energy Storage Does Europe Need?

How Much Energy Storage Does Europe Need?

On 12 July 2022, over 180 participants attended the webinar on how much energy storage does Europe need. The webinar aimed to discuss the huge role energy storage has to play in the evolving energy system, and shed light on how much energy storage will be needed, building upon our estimates in the recently published EASE review paper ‘Energy Storage Targets 2030 and 2050’.

In light of the EU’s ambitions to accelerate the energy transition and further increase climate and sector targets, critical questions still remain:

  • Can the energy system support high levels of wind and solar generation with existing infrastructure?
  • How will variable production of renewables be balanced without relying on back-up fossil fuel generation?

The webinar was moderated by Mr David Post, EASE President and the Head of Marketing and Sales Distributed Energy Solutions at Enel X. Panel discussion was joint by Jannis Burger – EDF Research Engineer, Joris Koornneef – TNO Strategy Consultant-Sustainable Geo Energy and Amir José Daou Pulido – Fluence Market Development Manager. Experts brought their perspectives on the topic debating how technologies, market opportunities and political decisions will shape the future of this sector.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

11.07.2022 /

Call for Endorsement: Energy Storage Targets!

Call for Endorsement: Energy Storage Targets!

EASE has estimated that the European Union requirements for energy storage are approximately 200 GW by 2030, and 600 GW by 2050 (of which over two-thirds are a no-regret option for energy shifting provided by power-to-X-to-power technologies). Current market trajectories for storage will fail to meet these requirements if urgent measures to boost deployment are not taken now. Yet, energy storage is an essential component for enabling renewables integration and establishing a secure, low-emission and affordable energy system.

Several actors active across the renewables and energy storage value chain have already endorsed these energy storage targets.

If you are interested in endorsing the targets, reach out to e.cirule@ease-storage.eu

 

 

 

 

Without clear policy intervention, the EU will be unable to further renewables deployment without relying on gas imports providing flexibility. In turn, this will further jeopardise energy security and ultimately, the EU will fail to achieve its decarbonisation targets. Therefore, the EU urgently needs to adopt energy storage targets and a strategy to accelerate the necessary storage deployment today.

By endorsing energy storage targets, stakeholders can send a clear message: to avoid fossil fuel lock-in, policymakers should fully untap the potential of renewables and energy storage.

If you have questions regarding how EASE developed these targets, the following paper explains the methodology and rationale.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

07.07.2022 /

The Way Forward for Energy Storage Grid Fees

The Way Forward for Energy Storage Grid Fees

EASE has prepared a general overview and the best practices across member states, when looking at the way forward for energy storage grid fees. Energy storage doesn’t receive the same treatment across the European Union as far as grid fees go: different technologies, different location (behind-the-meter vs front of the meter), have to face a variety of tariff structures, often not consistent with the EU-level rules as set by the Electricity Market Regulation.

To make sure grid fees don’t hinder energy storage development, EASE recommends:

  • Full implementation of the Clean Energy Package market design;
  • An analysis of network investments and the procurement of flexibility by system operators;
  • Grid tariff design should follow the main principle of cost-reflectiveness;
  • Behind-the-Meter energy storage systems should receive the same treatment as self-consumed energy which remains within the prosumer’s premises;
  • Tariff methodologies and procurement of flexibility should contribute to the deployment of energy storage.

In the Annex to this paper, a detailed description of the best practices carried out in Ireland (temporary abolition of generation related charges for commercial energy storage providers) and Portugal (for collective self-consumers and renewable energy communities, the use of the internal grid between a self-consumption unit and the consumption unit is exempted from grid fee payment) can be found.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

27.06.2022 /

Local Flexibility at DSO Level and the Multi-service Business Case of Energy Storage

Local Flexibility at DSO Level and the Multi-service Business Case of Energy Storage

The EASE Task Force on Multi-services Business Cases for Energy Storage has prepared a report looking at the key role of energy storage as a Local Flexibility provider. This paper gives an overview of existing short-term local flexibility schemes in Europe today including Active-network management (ANM) and other flexibility services and their implications on the business case for energy storage. However, flexibility markets in operation today are not compatible with the provision of multiple services, hindering the business case of energy storage. This report highlights possible options for their evolution and key market design questions. Such flexibility services must be designed and tendered in such a way that they allow for a level playing field for various flexibility options. An adequate Flexibility market design would enable the monetisation of flexibility provided by storage when acting as both demand and generation, allowing it to be stackable with other services.

EASE makes the following recommendations for the design of flexibility options:

  1. Monitor the implementation of article 32 of EU 2019/944 across Europe.
  2. Development of Standardised Flexibility Services markets based on capacity payments. Ideally these markets should enable contracting peak demand, congestion, voltage and stability products and should be compatible with zero carbon ambitions. Contractual frameworks should provide revenue certainty for solutions that require the development of physical assets. This would promote investability.
  3. Development of harmonised common principles to be integrated in assessment methodologies used to compare the cost and benefits of various Network options, e.g. ANM (grid flexibilities, flexibility connection), Flexibility Services and Network Reinforcement. Promote collaboration with key stakeholders in an open and transparent way.
  4. Enabling the trading of curtailment in the case of flexible connections and foster the creation of platforms to exchange energy in case of network congestion.
02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

16.06.2022 /

EMMES 6.0 - JUNE 2022

EMMES 6.0 – JUNE 2022

EASE and Delta-EE are pleased to announce the publication of the sixth edition of the European Market Monitor on Energy Storage (EMMES).

The Market Monitor is based on the most extensive database of European energy storage projects. The database of over 2,600 projects includes detailed data on current installations by customer segment (residential, C&I and front-of-meter) across 24 European countries, future projects and forecasts to 2030. The database is accompanied by a report which outlines key EU legislation, drivers and barriers for 12 core countries. The focus of the report is on electrochemical storage but the database includes other technologies, e.g pumped hydro.

EMMES 6 key takeaways:

  • 2022 will be a milestone year with > 5GW of new installations and >10GW of cumulative battery capacity. However, supply chain issues and raw material shortage is resulting in fewer installations into 2023 and 2024.
  • Cumulative battery power capacity by 2030 is expected to be ~57GW. In order to achieve climate ambitions, renewable targets and guarantee security of supply EASE has set a target of ~200GW of storage by 2030. This target is unlikely to be meet without additional support.
  • Front-of-meter batteries dominate both exsisting and new installations with limited capacity across both the residential and commercial and industrial sectors, with the exception of Germany and Italy. The former holds the largest residential market with ~200,000 annual installations whilst Italy is experiencing rapid growth due to government capex subsidies.
  • And much more…

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

15.06.2022 /

Energy Storage Targets 2030 and 2050

Energy Storage Targets 2030 and 2050

EASE has published an extensive review study for estimating Energy Storage Targets for 2030 and 2050 which will drive the necessary boost in storage deployment urgently needed today. Current market trajectories for storage deployment are significantly underestimating the system needs for energy storage. If we continue at historic deployment rates Europe will not be able to integrate the rapidly growing renewables and will fall short of its 2030 and 2050 climate targets.

In this report we highlight a number of areas in which storage needs are underestimated and find that many studies do not address all key energy storage technologies and durations, often undervaluing low emission technologies and energy shifting resources and overvaluing the use of fossil fuel plants especially in the 2030-time horizon. Furthermore, storage needs must be aligned with existing climate targets today especially as storage is a key enabler for the accelerated renewable buildout foreseen in Europe.

We account for these points in our target estimates for 2030 and 2050 and based on our analysis storage deployment needs to ramp-up to at least 14 GW/year in order to meet a target of approx. 200 GW by 2030.  By 2050 at least 600 GW storage will be needed in the energy system, with over two-thirds of this being provided by energy shifting technologies (power-to-X-to-power). Our report is an important source of information for informing key assumptions for storage in future energy system planning.

Energy storage needs to become a political priority alongside renewables, without a parallel storage strategy and scaling up of market-ready energy storage technologies, the EU will be unable to achieve a net-zero power system, risking continued exposure to volatile fossil energy markets. We emphasise these key priorities for storage:

  • A clear political commitment from the European Commission on an energy storage strategy including energy storage targets replicating in scope and ambition the Hydrogen strategy.
  • Promote the uptake of energy storage technologies, providing clear signals to investors and the energy storage industry to drive the necessary scale-up of storage solutions and a commitment to remove still existing barriers to their deployment and operation.
  • Mainstream energy storage in the European Commission’s implementation of the REPowerEU action plan and in the ongoing review of the Electricity Market Design.

Find here a short summary of the Energy Storage Targets report.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

28.04.2022 /

Renewable Energy Projects: Permit-Granting Processes & Power Purchase Agreements

Renewable Energy Projects: Permit-Granting Processes & Power Purchase Agreements

EASE has responded to the European Commission’s Public Consultation on ‘Renewable Energy Projects – Permit-Granting Processes & Power Purchase Agreements‘. This initiative aims to facilitate renewable energy production projects. It will focuses on the key barriers for implementation of renewable energy projects and outline good practices addressing the identified barriers and ways to facilitate power purchase agreements  across borders.

EASE prepared a reply to this consultation to contribute to the efficient development and deployment of renewable energy projects in the EU Member States in a favourable way to the energy storage sector. EASE welcomes the initiative as removing barriers to the permit-granting processes and power purchase agreements (PPAs) issues is essential for decarbonisation, clean energy transition, and energy security.

Regarding permitting procedures, EASE recognises the need for facility providing flexibility in the energy supply chain and options for flexible connection agreements for energy storage. In terms of its legislation, sharing the harmonised categorisation for energy storage among Member States is essential. Moreover, an accurate and accessible guideline for permitting is necessary as well as better training for government staff. EASE believes that procedures should be shortened and digitalised as well as that permitting should not be blocked while new legislation is elaborated. Concerning the PPAs, EASE supports the recognition of hybrid (RES + storage) PPAs in the EU legislation to enable that Member States set up frameworks. Lastly, EASE believes that all the changes should be based on political willingness for active renewable deployment, especially on energy storage, at both European and national levels.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

22.04.2022 /

Hydrogen and Decarbonised Gas markets Package

Hydrogen and Decarbonised Gas markets Package

EASE has responded to the European Commission’s Public Consultation on the proposal for ‘Hydrogen and Decarbonised Gas markets’ Package. This Package, consisting of a review of the Gas Regulation and of the Gas Directive, aims to decarbonise gas consumption, and puts forward policy measures required for supporting the creation of optimum and dedicated infrastructure, as well as efficient markets. It will remove barriers to decarbonisation and create the conditions for a more cost-effective transition. The objective of the revision proposal of the Package is to revise EU gas rules to facilitate the market entry of renewable and low-carbon gases and remove any undue regulatory barriers.

EASE has prepared two replies to this consultation, for the Gas Regulation and the Gas Directive separately, wishing to contribute to the change in the European gas market in favour of the energy storage sector. EASE welcomes the proposal for the Hydrogen and Decarbonised Gas package and it is fundamental for the clean energy transition. Yet, renewable and low-carbon gases’ role in energy storage solutions and technologies is not sufficiently acknowledged, such as in the definition and security of supply. In replies to the Regulation and the Directive of the Gas Package revision, EASE focuses on several significant points, including definitions, security of supply, tariff reduction, and blending of hydrogen. EASE believes that ensuring flexibility in the energy market by transparently and efficiently introducing renewable and low-carbon gases is the key to the energy transition.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

04.04.2022 /

Optimising Energy Use: How Energy Storage Can Support European Energy Reduction Needs

Optimising Energy Use: How Energy Storage Can Support European Energy Reduction Needs

The revisions of the Energy Performance and Buildings Directive and the Energy Efficiency Directive are vital to achieving a zero-emission and fully decarbonised building stock and a carbon-neutral energy system by 2050.

EASE welcomes these revisions as an opportunity to speed up decarbonisation efforts through the efficient and optimised use of energy. However, stronger integration of energy storage solutions is required.

These are the necessary steps to be urgently taken to favour faster emission reduction over the next decade:

  1. Optimising energy in buildings: Capture the benefits of building renovation to optimise energy consumption alongside the installation of renewable energy sources and energy storage, in addition to energy efficiency interventions. To maximise the benefits, the role of energy storage shall be considered when calculating the building’s energy performance;
  2. Buildings as active participants in the energy system: Buildings could play an important role in the increasingly electrified future energy system, by providing flexibility to the system and empowering consumers. In this regard, all necessary assets to reduce and make flexible building consumption must be deployed and monitored through the use of the Smart Readiness Indicator (SRI) and the installation of energy storage solutions;
  3. System integration to support an energy efficient system: Connecting the building, transportation, and energy sectors is critical to promote system efficiency. When combined with charging points, RES and heating and cooling applications, energy storage solutions directly support this integration by providing additional flexibility to the electricity grid.
02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

10.03.2022 /

Unleashing Flexibility Needs: How Energy Storage Can Make or Break the Case for Renewables

Unleashing Flexibility Needs: How Energy Storage Can Make or Break the Case for Renewables

EASE  has prepared a position paper on the Renewable Energy Directive Revision (REDIII) highlighting the great opportunity this review offers in terms of speeding up decarbonisation efforts in the energy system: EASE welcomes the 40% renewable energy targets for 2030, but calls for clearer support for energy storage to step up renewables deployment and ensure security of supply.

EASE believes energy storage can be fostered through RED III in multiple ways. Our key points:

  • Development of a strategy for energy storage, through a sound methodology assessing flexibility and energy shifting needs;
  • Definition of co-located storage facility and non-discriminatory treatment in tenders for RES plants;
  • Support the uptake of RES + storage PPAs and ensure non-discriminatory treatment for the issuing of Guarantees of Origin and green certificates;
  • Ensure full system integration through the proposed art. 20a;
  • Include energy storage technologies in the efforts to decarbonise the buildings and transport sectors.

Policymakers need to act quickly in view of the urgent need to decarbonise the European energy system: renewables need to be supported by flexibility technologies and through energy shifting, which only energy storage can provide.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

28.02.2022 /

EASE Activity Report 2021

EASE Activity Report 2021

Ten years ago, EASE started its journey to contribute to the green energy transition at the European level by leading the discussion on energy storage. EASE has grown along with its unique experience every year; 2021 benefited EASE the most by allowing it to be resilient through the new normal. The year 2021 is a prime example of the resilience of EASE, just like its journey over the last ten years. Despite long lasting effects from the COVID-19 pandemic, energy storage is on the table for discussion more often than ever before.

Among many other things, here are some of our achievements in 2021:

• The Energy Storage Global Conference (ESGC) 2021 was successfully held in a hybrid format, welcoming more than 350 participants, the highest number in its history. The number of participants and reviews prove that the hybrid ESGC encouraged flexible but in-depth discussions. Diverse participation from all over the world was possible thanks to the hybrid format.

• 2021 was a pivotal year for energy storage: while the pandemic was striking, the market kept growing steadily. European institutions as well as national governments drafted several proposals and plans that will influence energy markets regulation and the energy storage business case for years to come.

• The Fit for 55 Package, laying out implementation measures for the announced European Green Deal, was the most-awaited energy policy news of the year.  The European Commission revealed a set of dossiers that cover a variety of sectors where energy storage can be a key player.  EASE has been working closely with the Commission and other stakeholders to recommend apt frameworks that would empower energy storage to provide support to decarbonisation.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

08.02.2022 /

Call for More Energy Storage Provisions in Fit for 55

Call for More Energy Storage Provisions in Fit for 55

EASE, together with 10 other European and national associations, representing key energy stakeholders across the EU, calls on European legislators to support more provisions for long duration energy storage needed in the Delivering the European Green Deal package. To achieve carbon neutrality by 2050, all electricity generation must be decarbonised, as the hard-to-abate sectors cannot decarbonise as fast. This means that far more renewables need to be introduced into the energy system, leading to less back-up power from fossil fuel plants. Energy storage has a fundamental role to play in the clean energy transition, ensuring that more renewable energy can be introduced into the grid.

The joint letter call for the following provisions in the Delivering the European Green Deal package:

  • More favourable legal framework for the large-scale deployment of energy storage solutions across all EU Member States.
  • Increasing funding opportunities for not only short-term storage, but also long-term storage solutions. For the moment, mainly short-term energy storage, often Lithium-Ion, is in the focus of the funding.

Installing more long-term storage will also allow for significant savings in investment needed for our energy transmission infrastructure. This will keep electricity prices more stable and more affordable for the European end users. Large investments in energy infrastructure are needed for the energy transition, with capital flowing away from fossil fuels and toward clean power and other climate solutions.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

25.01.2022 /

Digitalising the Energy Sector – EU Action Plan

Digitalising the Energy Sector – EU Action Plan

EASE has taken part in the European Commission’s Public Consultation for the adoption of an Action Plan on the Digitalisation of the Energy Sector. EASE supports this initiative for the digitalisation of the energy sector which has the potential to play a key role in the energy transition towards a decarbonised European Union.

EASE believes that integrating digital technologies in the energy sector and energy storage solutions can provide numerous benefits such as increased energy system flexibility, energy optimisation, and energy system integration.

In its response to the consultation, EASE emphasised the importance of considering the role of flexibility, which can be enhanced by energy storage solutions and digital technologies. Furthermore, EASE highlighted the importance of and the barriers for consumers empowerment.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

21.01.2022 /

Joint Industry Position Paper on the Batteries Regulation: More Consideration Needed on the Global Battery Market’s Diversity

Joint Industry Position Paper on the Batteries Regulation: More Consideration Needed on the Global Battery Market’s Diversity

EASE together with other 10 industry associations covering the entire batteries value chain express their concerns about key elements in the ongoing debates in the European Parliament and the Council on the Batteries Regulation proposal, and provide recommendations for achieving shared goals.

The new Batteries Regulation is a new and holistic blueprint for future initiatives with several completely new measures: from recycled content to due diligence and carbon footprint.  However, the battery sector is too important and strategic to just turn it into a test case. Instead, all measures should be designed and implemented acknowledging the complexity involved in their delivery over the next decade.

In this paper we have identified five key risk areas (and relevant recommendations)  from current discussions in the co-decision process, which might endanger the competitiveness of the EU industry and the electrification of the transport, energy and industrial sectors:

  1. Recycled content: a very cautious approach is required and the entire process should also be simplified to reduce administrative burden
  2. Design requirements and second lifethe regulation should clarify the liability and conditions to reuse, remanufacture or repurpose a battery, but the decision to apply second life provisions should be only left to the market.
  3. Material recovery targets: the proposed measures and targets should not jeapordise a thriving EU battery ecosystem and should benefit the environment instead of increasing the carbon footprint.
  4. The scope of carbon footprint and of performance and durability: It is impossible to define one-size-fits-all criteria for all batteries, as they all serve different applications and have different technical requirements.  Instead we suggest to develop fit-for-purpose product category rules for the ‎carbon footprint calculation, starting with EVs and stationary battery energy storage ‎  ‎
  5. Restriction of hazardous substances: the regulation includes a new, parallel process to regulate hazardous substances used in batteries, duplicating the existing and well-established REACH restriction. Instead, the proposal should refer to the existing horizontal legislation rather than creating additional product specific requirements.

We call on co-legislators in the European Parliament and Council to consider fully the global battery market’s diversity and fast pace, and to only introduce new ambitions if their impacts have been fully assessed.

The current direction witnessed in the co-decision process shows that the EU battery industry will face major risks of multifaceted burden, innovative “test” measures with limited foundations. This ultimately threatens Europe’s strategic autonomy and risks slowing down the much-needed shift to zero emissions set out under the Fit for 55 package and the EU Green Deal.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

19.11.2021 /

Energy Taxation Directive to Support EU Decarbonisation Targets

Energy Taxation Directive to Support EU Decarbonisation Targets

The European Commission has adopted a recast Energy Taxation Directive in the context of the Fit for 55 Package, in order to ensure that tax rates for energy products can support decarbonisation targets.

As demonstrated by the EU decarbonisation strategy for 2050, energy storage technologies are playing a valuable role in the transition to a low-carbon energy system. This role is only set to increase with upward revision of the 2030 decarbonisation targets. In order to enable the deployment of energy storage the barriers that hamper a robust storage business case should be avoided.

EASE welcomes the recast Energy Taxation Directive, which goes in the right direction by making it possible to consider energy storage facilities as redistributors so to avoid double taxation, but more ambitious steps are needed, such as basing minimum tax rates on carbon content of the energy product, setting enforceable rules to phase-out double taxation in all Member States, and ensuring system integration is incentivised through favourable rates.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

12.11.2021 /

Services to Support Transmission Infrastructure

Services to Support Transmission Infrastructure

The Task Force on Segmentation of Applications has developed the Services to Support Transmission Infrastructure Report, among other application descriptions. This work builds on the Summary of Energy Storage Applications published in June 2020.

This overview provides a summary of different energy storage applications, focused mainly on the electricity system. Transmission infrastructure services could be provided by energy storage could as an alternative or complement to traditional transmission infrastructure assets.

Services to Support Transmission Infrastructure are composed of three key systems:

  1. Transmission Investment Deferral: deferring transmission infrastructure upgrades and solving transmission congestion issues by installing energy storage systems instead of new lines.
  2. Angular stability: use of energy storage to charge and discharge high levels of energy in short periods when an accident occurs, overall improving angular stability of the system.
  3. Transmission Support: use of energy storage to improve the performance of the transmission system by compensating for electrical anomalies and disturbances such as voltage sag, unstable voltage, and subsynchronous resonance.
02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

12.11.2021 /

Services to Support Distribution Infrastructure

Services to Support Distribution Infrastructure

The Task Force on Segmentation of Applications has developed the Services to Support Distribution Infrastructure Report, among other application descriptions. This work builds on the Summary of Energy Storage Applications published in June 2020.

This overview provides a summary of different energy storage applications that can provide alternative or traditional grid infrastructures at the distribution level. As the variable renewable energy sources are deployed regularly, these emerging services are gaining importance on the EU Market.

Services to Distribution Infrastructure are composed of six key systems:

  1. Distribution Grid Upgrade Deferral: using energy storage to defer or avoid distribution infrastructure upgrades and solve distribution congestion issues by installing energy storage systems instead of new lines; using energy storage as a distribution grid component to decrease the traditional grid size during the grid planning process by basing its design on a medium power value and not a peak power value.
  2. Contingency Grid Support: using energy storage to perform some capacity/voltage support in order to reduce the impacts of the loss of a major grid component. It refers to redundancy provisions to cover the trip of the largest transmission line in an area.
  3. Dynamic Local Voltage Control: using energy storage to maintain the voltage profile within admissible contractual/regulatory limits.
  4. Intentional Islanding: using energy storage to energise a non-loopable feeder during an outage.
  5. Reactive Power Compensation: using energy storage to reduce the amount of reactive energy drawn from transmission and charged by the TSO to the DSO.
  6. Cross Sectoral Storage: the practice of coupling the electricity sector with other energy sectors (gas, fuel, heat) by converting excess supply of electricity to the grid into energy carriers, synthetic fuels, and heat, thus avoiding curtailment of running power generators (RES, thermal power plants, etc.).
02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

12.11.2021 /

Ancillary Services

Ancillary Services

The Task Force on Segmentation of Applications has developed The Ancillary Services Report, among other application descriptions. This work builds on the Summary of Energy Storage Applications published in June 2020.

This overview provides a summary of different energy storage applications that support the efficient operation of the power grid. Ancillary Services are generally tendered by transmission and distribution system operators to ensure reliable power supply. These services can be provided by a variety of technologies as well as the already commonly tendered ones on the market, and provided by storage operators.

Services to Distribution Infrastructure are composed of nine key systems:

  1. Frequency Containment Reserve (FCR): primary frequency – maintains a balance between generation and consumption within the Synchronous Area. Aims to maintain the operational reliability of the power system of the Synchronous Area and stabilises the system frequency at a stationary value.
  2. Automatic Frequency Restoration Reserve (aFRR): Secondary frequency – adjusts the active power production of the generating units to restore the frequency and the interchanges with other systems to their target values following an imbalance, and brings the frequency back to its target value.
  3. Manual Frequency Restoration Reserve (mFRR): Tertiary frequency – restores primary and secondary frequency control reserves, manages congestion in the transmission network, and brings frequency and interchanges back to their target value.
  4. Replacement Reserve (RR): restoring or supporting the required level of frequency restoration reserve (FRR) and system imbalances, including generation reserves through active power reserves
  5. Load Following: serves as load following capacity that adjusts its output to balance the generation and the load within a specific region or area.
  6. Frequency Stability of Weak Grids: maintaining the frequency stability by helping avoid load shedding in islands due to the feasible very prompt response of distributed energy storage systems (DESS).
  7. Black Start: contributes to the process of recovering a power station to operation without relying on an external power network.
  8. Voltage Support: maintains voltage by injecting or absorbing reactive power by means of synchronous or static compensation. Different kinds of voltage control are implemented by individual TSOs, based on their own policies: primary, secondary and tertiary voltage.
  9. New Ancillary Services: delivers a reactive current response for voltage dips in excess and supplies the reactive current with a specific rise time.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

12.11.2021 /

Services to Support Behind the Meter Providing Customer Energy Management

Services to Support Behind the Meter Providing Customer Energy Management

The Task Force on Segmentation of Applications has developed the Services to Support Behind-the-Meter: Providing Customer Energy Management Report, among other descriptions. This work builds on the Summary of Energy Storage Applications published in June 2020.

This overview provides a summary of the customer energy management applications referring to the energy storage installed behind-the-meter to support end users and manage their energy supply and/or costs considering many residential, commercial and industrial consumers and customers are exposed to variable electricity tariffs.

Services to Support Behind the Meter Providing Customer Energy Management are composed of eight key systems:

  1. End-User Peak Shaving: use of energy storage to level out peaks in electricity use by residential or industrial and commercial power consumers, with the aim of minimising the cost of a customer’s invoice that varies according to their highest power demand.
  2. Time-of-Use Energy Cost Management: use of energy storage by customers subject to variable or ‘time-of-use’ electricity pricing to reduce the overall costs for electric service.
  3. Particular Requirements in Power Quality: use of energy storage to provide a high level of power quality above and beyond what the system offers.
  4. Maximising Self-Production & Self-Consumption of Electricity: use of energy storage to maximise self-production and self-consumption of electricity.
  5. Continuity of Energy Supply: use of energy storage device to substitute the network in case of interruption.
  6. Limitation of Upstream Disturbances: use of energy storage to limit the disturbances caused by distribution grids on upstream HV grids to contractual values.
  7. Compensation of Reactive Power: use of energy storage to compensate locally the reactive power.
  8. EV Integration: use of electric vehicles (EV) or plug-in hybrid EVs (PHEV) to provide Vehicle to Grid (V2G) functions to contribute to the grid balancing.

 

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

12.11.2021 /

#EnergyStorageMadeEasy

#EnergyStorageMadeEasy

EASE believes that energy storage is an essential enabler of the energy transition and recognises all technologies that support this transition. The #EnergyStorageMadeEasy Campaign aimed to raise awareness on the variety of energy storage technologies available and present in the EASE technology sheets.

The Association’s members represent different aspects of the energy storage sector and they ultimately work together to support different energy storage solution development and deployment across the EU in order to provide flexibility in different locations and at different timescales. It is important to recognise that different energy storage systems consider different technological possibilities, which EASE organises in 5 energy storage classes:

  • Chemical
  • Electrochemical
  • Electrical
  • Mechanical
  • Thermal

Over the period of five weeks, a variety of information on all technology groups was shared with the public through EASE’s Twitter and LinkedIn platforms. By sharing different information materials, videos, images and articles on technology groups, the #EnergyStorageMadeEasy campaign successfully interacted with EASE’s followers and reached new audiences.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

23.09.2021 /

Third Gas Package Revision: EASE Proposals for a Decarbonised Gas Market

Third Gas Package Revision: EASE Proposals for a Decarbonised Gas Market

The European Commission announced in its 2021 Working Programme that the Third Gas Package will be revised to regulate competitive decarbonised gas markets: EASE believes that energy storage solutions such as Hydrogen and Power-to-Gas will play a key role in the transition of the gas system, and sees the proposed revision as a great opportunity to enhance sector integration as well as the deployment of renewable carbon gases, as already stated in the Reply to the Public Consultation on the Hydrogen and Decarbonised Gas Market Package.

This document presents revision of the Third Gas Package in two sections. To read about the high level policy decisions needed to reshape the energy system, taking into account Power-to-Gas role, head to Chapter 1. To discover the specific regulatory changes necessary to improve the Power-to-Gas legislation at the EU level, head to Chapter 2.

The first part of the paper focuses on a few, key high-level messages that can help decision-makers design a new gas market that is inclusive of Hydrogen and Power-to-Gas storage solutions:

  • Develop an energy storage definition for the gas sector;
  • Develop technology neutral definitions for renewable and low-carbon gases;
  • Rely on a market-based approach for PtG;
  • Ensure that the new Package is in line with the EU Strategy on Energy System Integration;
  • Strengthen European R&D&I.

The second part of the paper collects specific suggestions which tackle different challenges for the Hydrogen and Decarbonised Gas Market Package:

  • Infrastructure planning;
  • Market regulation;
  • Guarantees of origin;
  • Consumers and communities;
  • Gas quality and blending;
  • Hydrogen trade and imports;
  • Security of supply.

The document is thoroughly analysed and the different proposals aim at supporting policymakers taking into account the storage industry’s take on the upcoming revision, making sure to untap the potential of energy storage technologies, especially Power-to-Gas, in decarbonising the gas sector.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

15.09.2021 /

Reply to the Public Consultation on All Continental Europe TSOs Proposal

Reply to the Public Consultation on All Continental Europe TSOs Proposal

EASE welcomes the efforts of ENTSO-E and all TSOs in the CE and Nordic synchronous area to determine a time period required for frequency containment reserve (FCR) providing units or groups with limited energy reservoirs (LER) to remain available during alert state, in accordance with Article 156(11) of SO GL.

The European Union as a whole has agreed on ambitious goals to increase renewable energy in the energy system and become carbon neutral by 2050. Energy storage technologies can provide an important contribution to system security while enabling the transition to a decarbonised energy system. The fast-dynamic response of energy storage devices is expected to help cope with the system inertia decrease and the RES variability, thereby contributing to grid stability. However, energy storage can only provide such services if there are no undue barriers in the network code provisions and market entry and development is attractive for LER.

EASE supports setting Tmin for FCR providers with LER to 15 minutes, however, EASE notes that the methodology itself should be re-assessed before it is possible to carry out the CBA and based on that, to discuss the results.

To see EASE’s reply to the ENTSO-E stakeholder consultation, please look at the file below.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

02.08.2021 /

Energy Storage Technologies are Essential to Decarbonisation: Revision of the Climate, Energy and Environmental Aid Guidelines

Energy Storage Technologies are Essential to Decarbonisation: Revision of the Climate, Energy and Environmental Aid Guidelines

EASE welcomes the revision of the Climate, Energy and Environmental Aid Guidelines (CEEAG) to align the State aid framework with the EU’s ambitious decarbonisation targets and the European Green Deal. With the revision of the EEAG, the EU seeks to address the challenge of ensuring a clear framework that supports decarbonisation in a cost-effective manner while maintaining competition and fair trade.

Overall, EASE supports the proposed enlargement of the scope of the guidelines to new areas (e.g. clean mobility, more forms of energy storage) and all technologies that can deliver the Green Deal, allowing higher aid amounts (up to 100% of the funding gap) as well as new aid instruments (e.g. Carbon Contracts for Difference).

EASE believes that appropriate levels of support through State aid should be allowed for energy storage technologies since their contribution to decarbonisation is already essential and will only become more so in the coming years. Providing valuable flexibility services at different grid locations and timescales, energy storage is essential to enabling the widespread deployment of renewable energy sources. Moreover, energy storage can play a vital role in supporting the transition of sectors that are particularly fossil fuels dependent or are hard to decarbonise. Grids are using more renewable energy to decarbonise and the effects of adding more intermittent renewable energy sources to those grids are creating characteristics which will require significant redress to stabilise and encourage further renewable energy penetration. These elements can be addressed by the introduction of energy storage technologies, and as a result energy storage support through State aid should have adequate safeguards against market distortions.

The importance of energy storage for the energy transition should be clearly reflected in the CEEAG. To see all EASE proposals for the revision, please look at the file below.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

23.06.2021 /

Energy Storage in the Renewable Energy Directive III

Energy Storage in the Renewable Energy Directive III

EASE welcomes EU policymakers’ efforts to revise the Renewable Energy Directive II (RED II) as part of the ‘Fit for 55’ package, expected July 2021. Accelerating the deployment of renewable energy sources (RES) is essential to achieve the EU’s ambitious goals of a 55% GHG emissions reduction by 2030 and carbon neutrality by 2050.  

However, simply deploying more RES is not enough; RES need to be integrated effectively into the system and their use in the heating and cooling, mobility, and industry sectors must be maximised.  

Energy storage is a key enabler of a RES-dominated system. The transition to a renewable-based energy system needs to be supported by energy storage in order to ensure security of supply, efficient energy system operation, and the competitiveness of EU industries.  

The revision of RED II as an important opportunity to reduce barriers to energy storage deployment, build on the provisions of the ‘Clean Energy for All Europeans’ Package, and position storage alongside RES as the backbone of the energy system. EASE proposes several key recommendations for the RED III: 

  1. Commit to a higher level of ambition in order to deliver on the EU Green Deal and the 2030 and 2050 decarbonisation targets. Increase the overall Union target for renewable energy in 2030 to 38-40% and make it binding both at EU and national level. 
  2. Define a comprehensive methodology to assess flexibility needs, which could be used to define an energy storage target to support the cost-effective integration of RES. 
  3. Revise Articles 4 and 5 of RED II on RES support schemes to explicitly include energy storage projects and incentivise projects that co-locate storage and renewables. 
  4. Reduce barriers to deployment of hybrid RES + storage projects.  
  5. Simplify and accelerate administrative procedures and permitting for energy storage facilities. 
  6. Support the deployment of thermal energy storage, both large-scale and small-scale, to help achieve the targets for RES in heating and cooling. 
  7. Add a renewable hydrogen definition encompassing all of its potential uses.  
  8. Ensure that together, the revised Third Energy Package for Gas and RED III provide a clear certification system for renewable and low-carbon hydrogen. 
  9. Expand articles 21 and 22 on renewable self-consumers and renewable energy communities to incentivise smart charging and vehicle-to-grid applications, which can maximise the uptake of RES in transport.  

EASE looks forward to working with policymakers to ensure that the RED III helps unleash the full potential of energy storage solutions to enable the cost-effective integration of very high shares of renewables.  

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

22.06.2021 /

EASE Reply to the Revision of the Hydrogen and Gas Market Decarbonisation Package

EASE Reply to the Revision of the Hydrogen and Gas Market Decarbonisation Package

EASE has provided a reply to the European Commission’s Public Consultation on the revision of the EU gas networks rules on market access addressing the Hydrogen and Gas Market Decarbonisation Package. As the Commission points out, a fully functioning internal energy market is key to ensuring security of supply, industry competitiveness and affordable energy for all consumers. It also contributes to achieving the emissions goals of the European Green Deal.

The key proposals from this initiative foresee the review of gas rules in order to:

  • facilitate the market entry of renewable and low-carbon gases
  • remove any undue regulatory barriers.

Costs for renewable energies have decreased significantly in the last ten years. In the relevant scenarios used by the Climate Target Plan Impact Assessment, biogas, renewable and low-carbon hydrogen and synthetic fuels would represent two-thirds of the gaseous fuels in the 2050 energy mix, with fossil gas used in combination with CCU/S representing the remainder. The areas where renewable and low-carbon gaseous fuels are expected to come into play include today’s industrial sectors (e.g. refineries, fertilisers, steel making, glass, ceramics) and certain heavy duty transport sectors (ships, aviation, long distance heavy vehicles). They are also expected to continue serving the needs of the electricity system as flexible power production. The role of gas in heating depends on the competition with other technologies, including heat pumps. The process to decarbonise the gas supply and to shift demand for gases to most needed uses must start already now. Achieving the 2030 renewable, energy efficiency and greenhouse-gas reduction targets in time is an important step in this process.

EASE is preparing a response to this consultation to improve the Hydrogen and Gas Market Directive and Regulation proposal in a way that is favourable to the energy storage sector.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

22.06.2021 /

EASE Calls for Stronger Focus on Energy Storage in the Revision of the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive

EASE Calls for Stronger Focus on Energy Storage in the Revision of the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive

EASE welcomes the revision of the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive to boost building renovation and emphasizes its support for the energy efficiency first principle to be applied in its measures. However, EASE believes that energy storage should have a stronger focus in the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive, considering energy systems integration and the widespread deployment of Smart Readiness Indicators are key to increasing energy efficiency.

Energy storage technologies can provide many benefits to building owners, tenants, and users, as well as to energy networks (electricity, heat). This can apply to both residential buildings and commercial/industrial buildings, due to the diversity and scalability of storage technologies. In addition, the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive should aim to reward the benefits that energy storage brings and encourage its uptake for behind-the-meter flexibility and network flexibility (peak-shaving, congestion management). The revision should also aim to remove the barriers to energy storage, by implementing ways to reduce the upfront cost, and raising awareness and expertise for its use in buildings.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

18.06.2021 /

Open Letter on Recovery and Resilience Facility: Too Little Attention and Funding for Energy Storage Solutions

Open Letter on Recovery and Resilience Facility: Too Little Attention and Funding for Energy Storage Solutions

On 18 June 2021, EASE – the European Association for Storage of Energy, together with 12 national energy storage associations* active across Europe, wrote an open letter to the European Commission to express concern about the lack of attention and funding for energy storage technologies in the Recovery and Resilience Plans (RRPs) submitted by EU Member States.

The associations urge the European Commission to carefully review the national plans to ensure that they meet the 37% climate spending target and to consider whether they devote sufficient funding for energy storage solutions.

Having reviewed the 23 RRPs submitted to date, many plans appear to fall short of the climate ambitions of the European Union. Too little attention and funding is dedicated to the energy storage sector: many Member States make no mention of energy storage in their plans, while others single out a small number of energy storage solutions for funding, rather than taking a technology neutral approach.

Given the importance of energy storage for achieving the EU Green Deal priorities, investments in this sector should be prioritised by the Recovery and Resilience Facility. The European Commission, in its review process, is asked to recommend that plans include targets for energy storage deployment, explicitly earmark funding for energy storage projects, and dedicate funding to the introduction of new policies and support schemes for clean energy technologies and flexibility providers.

When reviewing the Plans, the European Commission should seek to increase the level of ambition and motivate all EU Member States to make the most of the unique opportunity offered by the Recovery and Resilience Facility. The energy storage sector is ready to play its part to accelerate the transition to a net-zero energy system and will continue to engage with EU and national policymakers to ensure that the EU Green Deal and COVID-19 Recovery policies can help unleash the potential of energy storage technologies.

* AEPIBAL (Spain), AKU-BAT CZ (Czechia), APSTE (Bulgaria), ASEALEN (Spain), ATEE (France), BVES (Germany), EASE (EU), Elettricità Futura (Italy), ENERGYIN (Portugal), Energy Storage Ireland, Energy Storage NL (Netherlands), PIME (Poland), Slovak Battery Alliance.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

12.05.2021 /

The Role of Energy Storage in the Renovation Wave

The Role of Energy Storage in the Renovation Wave

On 22 April 2021, over 90 participants attended the workshop on the role of energy storage in the Renovation Wave. In October 2020, the European Commission launched its Renovation Wave strategy, to increase the energy renovation rate of buildings and significantly improve the overall energy performance of the EU building sector. This strategy brings opportunities for the energy storage sector, considering the invaluable role of energy storage for energy efficiency.

The workshop was kicked off with a presentation giving a comprehensive overview of the Renovation Wave from Nina Neumann – Legislative Development and Enforcement Team Leader in DG Energy Unit B3 in the European Commission.

Energy community and thermal energy storage are two of the solutions contributing to the goal of the Renovation Wave and were presented in the workshop. For the first presentation showcasing projects from the energy storage industry, Luigi Lanuzza, Head of B2C and B2B Innovation Factory at Enel X, presented an overview of Enel’s projects on Energy Communities. Mr Lanuzza described how the energy sector is changing towards decarbonisation from the utility’s point of view, and how value is shifting from commodity to services. The second presentation from the energy storage industry was given by Ruud Cuypers, Senior Scientist and Program Manager for Thermal Energy Storage at TNO, who provided 2 examples of TNO’s projects on thermal energy storage based on thermochemical materials.

The key takeaways of the event were presented by Ms Beatriz Sinobas, Energy Security and Electricity Team Leader at DG Energy Unit B4, the European Commission, concluding that the Renovation Wave is now in full rollout, and its success is necessary to meet EU climate targets.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

30.04.2021 /

EASE Position Paper on the Batteries Regulation Proposal

EASE Position Paper on the Batteries Regulation Proposal

On 10 December 2020 the Commission proposed a new Batteries Regulation aimed at ensuring that batteries placed in the EU market are sustainable and safe throughout their entire life cycle. The Regulation aims to minimise batteries’ harmful effects on the environment. The rules cover their full life cycle; from design & production to reuse & recycling.

In line with the Green Deal and other sustainability-related policies, this initiative would update EU rules to ensure:

  • All batteries are produced sustainably (i.e. with low resource consumption and little waste generated) and can be easily recycled;
  • Any batteries used in the growing market for electric vehicles are sustainable;

EASE welcomes the proposal for the new Batteries Regulation: although several criticalities are present, it is a step forward to tackle several of the barriers that currently hinder the battery market. Importantly, it considers the “stationary battery energy storage system” for the first time.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

23.03.2021 /

EMMES 5.0 - March 2021

EMMES 5.0 – March 2021

EASE and Delta-ee are pleased to announce the publication of the fifth edition of the European Market Monitor on Energy Storage (EMMES).

The report reveals the effects of the pandemic on the energy storage market, with lockdown affecting commercial and industrial, and behind-the-meter segments, while front-of-meter projects proved more resilient. Looking ahead, 2021 looks particularly strong for the sector with new ancillary services opening across Europe and national targets further supporting regional projects.

EMMES 5.0 shows that:

  • The European annual energy storage market grew to 1.7 GWh in 2020, with a cumulative installed base of 5.4 GWh across all segments.
  • The total annual energy storage market in Europe is expected to reach 3,000 MWh in 2021, almost double the annual storage deployments seen in 2020.
  • And much more…

 

EMMES 5.0 is now available for 5.000 Euro.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

17.03.2021 /

Power-to-Gas: Policies and Actions in Europe

Power-to-Gas: Policies and Actions in Europe

EASE has prepared an overview of the upcoming and existing key policy and actions of Spain, the Netherlands and Germany to support the uptake of hydrogen and Power-to-Gas solutions.

Hydrogen and Power-to-Gas are chemical energy storage technologies; one of five energy storage “families” identified by EASE. Electricity-produced hydrogen can be used for transport (fuel), for heating (fuel), as a raw material (chemical feedstock); to balance electricity demand and supply and to support the management of the electricity grid (through storage).

The European Union, and many of its Member States, consider clean hydrogen a key priority to achieve the European Green Deal and Europe’s clean energy transition. Yet, today, hydrogen is a modest fraction of the European energy mix.

EASE welcomes the two strategies presented by the European Commission in 2020, the Energy System Integration and Hydrogen. While it seems clear that coordination at the European Union level is necessary, different states are trying to introduce complementary policies and initiatives to favour its uptake. It seems one-size-fits-all solutions may not exist – States have different characteristics and priorities, so different approaches are necessary.

In this document, we will focus solely on hydrogen produced through Power-to-Gas, i.e. by electrolysis. Other technologies to produce hydrogen are not considered.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

04.03.2021 /

Reply to the Public Consultation on the Batteries Regulation Proposal

Reply to the Public Consultation on the Batteries Regulation Proposal

EASE has provided a response to the European Commission’s Public Consultation on the new Batteries Regulation proposed on 10 December 2020. This Regulation aims to ensure that batteries placed in the EU market are sustainable and safe throughout their entire life cycle.

EASE prepared a reply to this consultation to further improve the Batteries Regulation in a way that is favourable to the energy storage sector. EU law aims to minimise batteries’ harmful effects on the environment. The rules cover their full life cycle, from design & production to reuse & recycling. In line with the Green Deal and other sustainability-related policies, this initiative would update EU rules to ensure:

  • all batteries are produced sustainably (i.e. with low resource consumption and little waste generated) and can be easily recycled
  • any batteries used in the growing market for electric vehicles are sustainable.

EASE welcomes the proposal for the Batteries Regulation: although several criticalities are present, it is a step forward to tackle several of the barriers that currently hinder the battery market. EASE believes creating a level-playing field is key. Some of the Proposal provisions go in this sense – e.g., the recognition that different types of batteries are needed. In other articles,  the focus seemed to lie on specific battery solutions, e.g. the ones currently leading the market, therefore not adopting a technology-neutral approach, with the risk of hampering innovation and competition.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

15.02.2021 /

EASE Activity Report 2020

EASE Activity Report 2020

2020 was a significant year for EASE and the energy storage sector.

With a bigger Secretariat than ever before, 2020 was to be our most productive year yet, full of meetings, and networking with policymakers and EASE members.

We worked hard to drive forward the EU policy agenda to support energy storage deployment and were happy to see that, despite the challenges posed by the pandemic, EU policymakers stayed true to their climate ambitions and prepared dozens of European Green Deal proposals, from the Renovation Wave to the Just Transition Fund.

Among many other things, here are some of our achievements in 2020:

• We strengthened our ties with EU policymakers and joined several new alliances: the Clean Hydrogen Alliance, Batteries European Partnership Association, International Forum on Pumped Hydro Storage, and more.

• In collaboration with Delta-ee, we issued the fourth edition of the European Market Monitor on Energy Storage, with more data and information on market and policy developments than ever before.

• More and better services to members: we launched our new EASE website, revamped our Members Only Section, and launched the twice-monthly policy update newsletter.

• Moving to remote work, we held many webinars and networking events for members, covering topics such as energy storage in Ukraine, the Innovation Fund, the launch of new flexibility services in Italy, and many others.

• 16 organisations became EASE members, adding to our diverse and innovative membership base.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

11.02.2021 /

The Batteries of the Future: Actions to Take Today

The Batteries of the Future: Actions to Take Today

On 9 February 2021, EASE and Batteries Europe welcomed more than 200 participants to discuss the future of batteries, the challenges currently faced by battery manufacturers, and possible solutions to foster the EU leadership in the battery storage field.

 

 

The batteries of the future

Ms Edel Sheridan, representing the Batteries Europe Secretariat, highlighted how new and emerging technologies, new raw materials, cell design, and manufacturing, as well as a higher degree of digitalisation, are to be expected in the near future. This will lead to new applications with greater tailoring for e.g. both mobility and stationary storage, and with smart functionality resulting in longer life and higher performance for batteries. It is paramount to adopt a circular economy approach, in line with the EU climate objectives. But in order to achieve a sustainable battery design, production, use and recycling, a great coordination effort in terms of R&I is needed.

Battery technologies have the potential to radically change the future energy and mobility systems but, as highlighted by EASE Secretary General, Mr Patrick Clerens, the battery legislation needs to adapt to foster innovation and new battery solutions. Performance and durability requirements may be rapidly outdated and hinder the introduction of new types of batteries, while preventing manufacturers from introducing specific solutions for different clients. Similarly, Mr Clerens suggested that ambitious, proper, science-based recycling rates are needed – batteries’ content must be recycled – e.g. within the industry, not necessarily in new batteries. Finally, to untap the potential of competition that can lead to new, transformative batteries, it is fundamental to adopt a “technology neutral” approach in the legislation.

 

The challenges for the battery Industry

During the event representatives for the batteries industry shared their views on the main challenges currently faced by battery manufactures in Europe. The debate revolved around some key points:

  • Innovation in Europe
  • Market regulation
  • Manufacturing and recycling challenges
  • Attracting investments

Panellists discussed that, even for battery technologies that have been around for decades, there is still untapped potential. Innovations in Europe are pushing the boundaries in terms of e.g. performance and recyclability.

Besides, when discussing how market regulation can foster the battery storage business case, a few points were highlighted. First, that regulation should allow for long-term contracts for services offered by storage facilities. Also, that is hard to find a niche market for new technologies – the market is not segmented between short and long(er) term storage. Besides, that double charging should be avoided. Finally, that new market products for flexibility services/proper price signals/tender mechanisms should be introduced across Europe.

Panellists also talked about manufacturing: upscaling can be a serious challenge. But it is paramount to produce in sustainable way, tackling challenges along all the value chain. Besides, the importance of focusing on low footprint, supply chain ethics and sustainability (manufacturers have a social responsibility), recycling and circularity was also touched upon. Still, on the latter point, a paradox was highlighted: if materials are cheap, abundant and environmentally friendly, there may be no value in recycling and it is a pure cost.

When discussing investments, it was underlined that it is hard to attract investments for different technologies – investors tend to focus on Li-Ion. A panellist also pointed out that, on top of the previously mentioned market regulation changes, it is key to ensure health and safety by being open and transparent with all stakeholders – also to attract investors.

All in all, actors active in the battery value chain face several challenges. It is paramount to create a level playing field where different batteries technologies compete while being appropriately remunerated for the services they provide.

 

EU leadership

The EU has the opportunity to strengthen the European battery value chain and promote innovation through appropriate legislation. In this sense the Batteries Regulation Proposal presented by the European Commission in December 2020 is very ambitious and “all-encompassing”. During the event, Ms Flavia Raffaelli, Head of Unit for Circular Economy and Construction at the European Commission, underlined that the Commission aims at having batteries for different sectors and recognise that all energy storage technologies are an enabler of the energy transition. She also pointed out that one of the Commission’s objectives is to create a “snowball effect”, i.e. that EU’s provisions will be adopted around the world. Finally, MEP Claudia Gamon (Renew Europe group) stressed the commitment of the European Parliament to make clear to industry stakeholders, national and regional authorities that energy storage is key for the energy transition.

 

What are EASE’s conclusions?

Europe has the opportunity to attract investments and achieve ambitious targets, if the industry and politics are able to launch appropriate initiatives. Developing sustainable, innovative batteries is a key objective of the EU. While recent initiatives, both from the EU and Industry stakeholders, go in the right direction, there is still significant room for improvement, especially from a regulatory perspective.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

10.02.2021 /

EASE Reply to the European Commission’s Public Consultation on the TEN-E Regulation Revision

EASE Reply to the European Commission’s Public Consultation on the TEN-E Regulation Revision

On 15 December 2020, the European Commission adopted a proposal to revise the EU rules on the Trans-European Networks for Energy (TEN-E) Regulation. The new regulation aims to contribute to the EU emissions reduction objectives by promoting the integration of renewables and new clean energy technologies into the energy system. It seeks to continue to connect regions currently isolated from European energy markets, strengthen existing cross-border interconnections and promote cooperation with partner countries. It also aims to help timely delivery of cross-border infrastructure by proposing ways to simplify and accelerate permitting and authorisation procedures.

EASE has prepared a reply to this consultation to promote a TEN-E Regulation in line with the European Union’s climate objectives and able to properly recognise the value of energy storage solutions.

EASE welcomes the proposal for the new TEN-E Regulation: it is a step forward, a piece of legislation more in line with the European Union’s climate objectives, although criticalities are still present.

EASE is glad to see that the role of flexibility as a tool to improve infrastructure planning for energy system integration is considered, and that the idea of involving users “in the management of their energy usage” as criteria for smart electricity grid projects is present. Still, additional focus on flexibility solutions – in particular energy storage – is needed.

The absence of a synergy plan with the TEN-T is surprising: this may be a missed opportunity, especially in the context of Alternative Fuels Infrastructure.

The reorganisation of the priority corridors excluding natural gas from the available corridors’ categories is positive; and regarding Projects of Common Interest (PCI), EASE welcomes the fact that sustainability criteria are now present for mutual interest projects. But it must be underlined the risk that fossil fuels projects may still de facto be selected. This should be avoided: it should be clarified that pipelines are supported only in the case they transport renewable and low-carbon gases. In addition, EASE believes the lack of introduction of specific PCI categories for market-based tools (i.e. non-network related PCI flexibility and storage) is a missed opportunity. On the other hand, the focus on small(er) scale project is key recognition of the importance of different solutions for the energy system.

Regarding governance matters, the decision to further empower ACER is positive. EASE approves ACER being given additional tasks, such as developing framework guidelines for Scenario Development. However, there also may be a further need of a joint planning approach for gas and electricity: this is key in the context of system integration. Looking at the CBA methodology developed by the ENTSOs, the additional power given to ACER is a positive change: still, ACER should be able to approve the methodology and issue appropriate, binding guidelines. Similarly, EASE also believes further details on how to appropriately empower stakeholders and achieve accountability may be needed. On the extensive consultation that ENTSO-E and ENTSO-G should conduct, it is unclear the reason behind only hydrogen stakeholders being mentioned. Moreover, in general, stakeholders should be more comprehensively consulted, being appropriately requested to provide inputs on ENTSO’s CBA Methodology.

Some elements may need clarification. EASE positively assesses the inclusion of smart grids in the priority thematic areas. However, the practical consequences of these changes are unclear. Similarly, it is also unclear why specific objectives for hydrogen and offshore renewable energy are present, e.g. in the context of performance indicators on page 59 of the Proposal – while being absent for other solutions.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

09.02.2021 /

The Revision of the Renewable Energy Directive: An Opportunity to Increase the EU’s Renewables Ambitions and Accelerate Energy Storage Deployment

The Revision of the Renewable Energy Directive: An Opportunity to Increase the EU’s Renewables Ambitions and Accelerate Energy Storage Deployment

EASE has provided its reply to the European Commission’s public consultation on the revision of the Renewable Energy Directive.

The revision of the recast Renewable Energy Directive (RED II) is essential in order to achieve the target of at least 55% greenhouse gas emissions reduction compared to 1990 levels. The next Directive, RED III, must have more ambitious targets to accelerate the energy transition and align with the European Green Deal.

We believe that it is important to set challenging short-term as well as long-term targets in order to clearly signal the EU’s commitment to addressing the climate challenge. The overall renewable energy target for 2030 should be increased, and it should be mandatory both at EU and national level. In addition, EASE supports increased targets for renewable energy in transport for 2030.

More ambitious targets can only be achieved with forward-looking and ambitious policy. The revision of RED II presents a valuable opportunity to address barriers to the deployment of energy storage technologies. Energy storage is an essential enabler of a renewables-based system, without which it is impossible to maintain security of supply and efficient energy system operation.

Policymakers should consider measures to support deployment of storage technologies, since:

  • Energy storage technologies contribute to increasing the share of renewable electricity used in the energy mix by reducing or avoiding curtailment of renewable electricity generation. By shifting the use of excess renewable electricity forward in time to periods of deficit, RES essentially become dispatchable, which greatly facilitates their integration into the energy system, and ensures optimal use of installed RES capacities.
  • When optimally located, energy storage solutions can enhance the optimal use of the transmission and distribution grid, avoiding congestions.
  • Energy storage can help decarbonise the heating and cooling sectors, which are currently heavily dependent on fossil fuels.
  • Finally, some of these technologies, for example Power-to-Gas and Power-to-Liquid, can be used to produce renewable fuels (e.g. synthetic methane, methanol) or chemicals (e.g. ammonia).

Barriers to the deployment of energy storage solutions, including hybrid renewables + storage projects, should therefore be systematically addressed. RED III should focus also on supporting the roll-out of thermal energy storage, both small-scale and large-scale solutions, as well as power-to-x and decarbonisation of transport. This is highly important to ensure that RED III is aligned with the EU’s energy system integration strategy, which should allow all relevant technologies to compete on a more equal playing field, also across energy carriers.

The RED II contains several aspects related to energy efficiency, which is highly important. EASE would like to also like to see policymakers prioritise energy optimisation. This means having a more flexible energy supply and demand at all levels of the system, including behind-the-meter for residential or commercial & industrial consumers, to optimise the use of energy via flexibility sources such as energy storage.

EASE members are fully supportive of the EU Green Deal and see the revision of RED II as an important step in the right direction. A clear, predictable and transparent investment framework with long term market signals is an essential prerequisite to further exploit the potential of RES and energy storage. We hope that RED III will fully recognise the essential role of energy storage and help build a robust regulatory and policy framework to support all types of energy storage technologies.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

02.02.2021 /

EASE Reply to the European Commission Public Consultation on the Revision of the Directive on Intelligent Transport Systems

EASE Reply to the European Commission Public Consultation on the Revision of the Directive on Intelligent Transport Systems

EASE took part on the public consultation on Directive 2010/40/EU (The ITS Directive). The directive aims to accelerate and coordinate the deployment and use of Intelligent Transport Systems applied to road transport and its interfaces with other transport modes. EASE, as voice of the energy storage industry, argues that Intelligent Transport Systems and energy storage go hand in hand and they can contribute to decarbonisation.

It is key to elaborate a legislation able to link the transport and energy sectors and related infrastructure: Vehicle-to-Grid technologies are crucial assets to manage the future energy system and decarbonise the transport sector, while also empowering customers. Sector integration is a key pillar of the EU decarbonisation strategy.

  • Awareness. Citizens concerns about range or availability of their vehicles if engaged in Vehicle-to-Grid schemes is a significant barrier. Customers need to be well informed and incentivised to participate with fair reward in Vehicle-Grid Integration schemes.
  • Added value for consumers. Electric vehicles must be equipped with the capability to allow for bidirectional flows of electricity between the vehicle and the grid. The Vehicle-to-Grid system’s price, set by both the vehicle and charger manufacturers, should be affordable enough to better attract customers. The EV owner must be remunerated by the aggregator for providing grid services to the grid operator and must be assured that the vehicle will be available for personal use when needed. Similarly, the aggregator must derive enough benefit from the availability of vehicles to compensate for the additional cost of monitoring and controlling the vehicle-grid interactions, remunerating EV owners, and administering the system.
  • Harmonisation of the market. EU legislation is key to avoid a fragmented EU market where Member States have different levels of ambition. It is paramount to ensure and simplify/harmonise market compliance at EU level, and ensure clarity on business models. It is important to set up standards and protocols that apply across the EU and ensure interoperability, continuity of applications, systems and services across different Member States.
  • Interoperability, harmonised protocols, and standards among infrastructures and systems should be implemented to enable seamless communication. Technical standards for charging processes are mostly defined but there is currently no formal procedure to ensure the compliance between these standards and the vehicles coming into the EU market from abroad. These standards are crucial to ensure consumer engagement and the provision of vehicle-grid integration services over Europe while avoiding overinvestment.
  • Data. Access to energy consumption data should be ensured. Availability of charging patterns to the electric vehicles energy supplier or electric vehicles aggregator is crucial for consumers to be offered the right tariffs. This should include protection of consumer privacy and security and the consumers’ access to their own data, notably in case of switching of service provider. It is key to avoid technical barriers: technical costs (AC/DC, software, hardware) could hamper EV/V2G deployment.
02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

15.01.2021 /

EASE Reply to the Public Consultation for the Revision of the Guidelines on State Aid for Environmental Protection and Energy

EASE Reply to the Public Consultation for the Revision of the Guidelines on State Aid for Environmental Protection and Energy

EASE took part in the European Commission Public Consultation for the Revision of the Guidelines on State aid for Environmental protection and energy 2014-2020 (EEAG). EASE supports updating the EEAG to achieve a normative framework that is aligned with the EU’s ambitious decarbonisation targets and the European Green Deal more broadly.

EASE believes that higher support through state aid should be allowed for energy storage technologies since their contribution to decarbonisation is already essential and will only become more so in the coming years.

Providing valuable flexibility services at different grid locations and timescales, energy storage is essential to enabling the widespread deployment of renewable energy sources. Moreover, energy storage can play a vital role in supporting the transition of sectors that present high energy intensity or are hard to decarbonise. Energy storage support through state aid should have adequate safeguards against market distortions.

In its consultation reply, EASE highlighted several considerations for aligning the EEAG with the European Green Deal. One primary issue is the scope of support for key decarbonisation technologies. The scope of support for energy storage projects must be expanded, in line with the energy storage provisions in the Clean Energy Package:

  • Covering all energy storage technologies, including power-to-x, rather than only ‘electricity storage’ as currently defined in Article 1, Par. 1.3, 31-(a)-(iii) of the EEAG. A technology neutral approach is essential to allow the various energy storage solutions to compete on a level playing field, rather than picking winners and losers through administrative procedures.
  • We do not see a rationale for limiting the consideration of storage projects to those connected to high-voltage transmission lines designed for a voltage of 110kV or more (as is currently the case in the EEAG). Many energy storage facilities are now deployed at distribution level to support the integration of variable Renewable Energy Sources (vRES), and storage can also be deployed behind-the-meter at commercial & industrial facilities as well as residential homes.

The unique added value of energy storage to the energy system must be supported also in the EEAG, in order to ensure a fair treatment of these solutions.

In addition to energy storage, higher aid intensities could be warranted for renewable and low-carbon hydrogen production, decarbonisation of heating and cooling (including thermal storage), industrial decarbonisation, low/zero-emission transport infrastructure, and energy infrastructure. Aid for energy storage and renewable/low-carbon hydrogen could cover operating costs on top of investment costs, as long as there are sufficient safeguards against undue competition distortion.

EASE supports the introduction of carbon contracts that will reimburse the extra costs resulting from decarbonisation by paying the investor the difference between the costs of reducing one ton of CO2 to produce a given product and the actual CO2 price in the ETS. This type of contract could create a further incentive for industries to invest in decarbonisation technologies beyond the ETS incentive by removing uncertainties the investment’s profitability and guaranteeing a specific return rate for the investment. EASE believes that carbon contracts should only be awarded via competitive bidding procedures and be technologically neutral. Besides the contracts should be sector-specific, provided it is possible to have a competitive bidding procedure. They should apply only to investments that have a high emissions reduction potential and cover only sectors that are facing particular technological challenges to decarbonise. In any case, EASE affirms that a well-functioning ETS is essential to ensure an effective decarbonisation process. Therefore, carbon contracts for difference must be designed to avoid distortions.

Given the regional nature of the decarbonisation challenge, EASE sees as positive an opening of Member States’ support schemes for decarbonisation across borders (up to 10% of the scheme). Such an initiative could help ensure a more harmonised market, reducing the risk of “deep-pocket distortions” between Member States.

With the revision of the EEAG, the EU faces the challenge of ensuring a clear framework that supports decarbonisation in a cost-effective manner while maintaining competition and fair trade. EASE is committed to supporting the process and ensuring the fair consideration of energy storage technologies.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

21.12.2020 /

EASE Inputs to the Public Consultation on Sustainable Finance

EASE Inputs to the Public Consultation on Sustainable Finance

EASE welcomes the development of a classification system for sustainable economic activities that can incentivise investments in clean energy technology. Energy storage solutions have an important role to play in the clean energy transition by integrating higher shares of vRES while supporting efficient system operation and security of supply. Therefore, it is positive that the technical screening criteria listed in the annex to the draft delegated regulation recognise ‘storage of electricity’, ‘storage of thermal energy’, and ‘storage of hydrogen’ as activities that contribute substantially to climate change adaptation.

However, EASE is concerned about the assessment of pumped hydro storage (PHS) facilities due to unclear or unjust criteria, especially compared to other storage and renewable technologies. The draft technical screening criteria are not based on existing EU legislation and are not aligned with the proposals of the technical expert group. The classification of PHS within the category ‘storage of electricity’ is not fact-based and could lead to all PHS being excluded from the taxonomy.

Also, energy storage technologies, including PHS, are categorised as enabling activities only. They should be categorised as economic activities, making a substantial contribution based on their own performance.

EASE therefore calls for a careful revision of the draft criteria related to energy storage, hydropower and PHS, particularly the categorisation of different types of PHS, to ensure a fact-based approach that recognises the important contribution of energy storage including PHS to the energy transition.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

10.11.2020 /

Conclusions on EASE Reply to the European Commission Public Consultation on the Revision of the Energy Taxation Directive

Conclusions on EASE Reply to the European Commission Public Consultation on the Revision of the Energy Taxation Directive

EASE, as the voice of energy storage sector, welcomes the revision of the Energy Taxation Directive and sees, in addition to the barriers of double taxation the following as the main recommendations relevant for energy storage for the review of ETD, many of which were also raised in the European Commission study on energy storage:

  • Update minimum tax rates for energy products considering technology neutrality. Energy taxation should in general be technology neutral, stimulate processes that increase overall efficiency, and internalise the externalities of the different technologies. The latter refers especially to negative environmental externalities such as emissions of greenhouse gases and local pollutants, when not internalised through other mechanisms such as the Emissions Trading Scheme.
  • End-use and intermediate processes. A distinction needs to be made between on the one hand energy use for intermediate processes, for example storage and conversion technologies such as power-to-gas or gas-to-power, and on the other hand energy end-use. Energy taxation should only apply to end-use of energy products, as is the stated objective of the current ETD.
  • Energy losses. Energy losses in the storage cycle could be subject to energy taxation if considered end-use. However, the current ETD states in art. 21(3) that energy consumption in an establishment producing energy products does not give rise to a chargeable event (e.g. electricity consumption in power plants). Following this and to treat storage equally vis-à-vis other energy producers, losses in the storage cycle should not be subject to energy taxation either.
  • Update of energy products. The use in the ETD of static references to Common Nomenclature codes and the lack of reference to products not significant at the time of the approval of the ETD leads to an outdated harmonised scope for certain energy products, such as hydrogen, produced from carbon neutral energy sources. Energy products scope should be updated to include products supporting cross-sectoral integration, such as power-to-gas. In the process of revision of the energy products EASE would like to emphasise that hydrogen should be classified with reference to its carbon footprint and the nature of the electricity used for its productio For further information please find EASE recommendations on the classification and definition of the renewable and low-carbon gases;
  • Define taxation levels based on the energy and GHG content. The ETD does not treat energy products equally, as taxes are not required to be based on the carbon content, nor energy content in the case of fuels. Defining minimum taxation levels based on energy and carbon content is a central step in providing an equal playing field for all energy products;
  • Clarify whether the conditional exclusion of electricity from the ETD scope applies to hydrogen electrolysis. The ETD scope does not cover electricity, when it accounts for more than 50 % of the cost of a product (considering purchased goods, personnel and fixed capital costs). This could be the case of hydrogen produced from electrolysis but would also depend on electricity prices and electrolyser costs. The threshold could provide perverse incentives to increase the cost share of purchased electricity;
  • Consider including smart sector integration, including electricity heat and cold, in the scope of the ETD. There is a need to introduce additional multi-sectorial elements in the ETD to further support energy efficiency and decarbonisation goals. Heat or cold networks are not significantly integrated at the moment. However, competition between alternative energy carriers for heating, increased sector coupling and integration of heat networks could require minimum harmonization of taxation for heat and other energy carriers (considering energy and GHG content). This includes any potential exemptions for all energy carriers. For example, Liquid Air Energy Storage could provide a means to support electricity and cooling networks, providing an alternative to solutions relying on refrigerant gases with high GWP.

Please read the article summarising the main points of EASE reply to the European Commission public consultation or the EASE reply itself, accessible below.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

10.11.2020 /

Services to Support Generation and Services to Support Bulk Storage

Services to Support Generation and Services to Support Bulk Storage

The Task Force on Segmentation of Applications has developed the Services to Support Generation and Services to Support Bulk Storage Report, among other application descriptions. This work builds on the Summary of Energy Storage Applications published in June 2020.

The services to support generation and bulk storage can ensure a vast and clean energy generation from renewable sources and can be divided into seven categories:

  • Energy arbitrage: The ability of a consumer or entity to buy electricity when the price is low and use it when the price is high.
  • System electricity supply capacity: The use of energy storage in place of combustion turbine to provide the system with peak generation capacity.
  • Support to conventional generation:  Optimising operation of conventional generation assets including generator bridging and generator ramping.
  • Ancillary services RES support: The use of energy storage to help variable renewable generation contribute to ancillary services by providing some reserve power.
  • Capacity firming: The use of energy storage to render variable RES output more constant during a given period of time.
  • RES curtailment minimisation: Use of energy storage to absorb variable RES that cannot be injected into the electricity grid due to lack of demand, either delivering it to the electricity grid when needed or converting it into another energy vector (gas, fuel or heat) to be delivered to the relevant grid.
  • Seasonal arbitrage: Taking advantage of an electricity price difference in the wholesale electricity market between 2 seasons.
02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

01.10.2020 /

Open Letter on the Revision of the TEN-E Regulation

Open Letter on the Revision of the TEN-E Regulation

Following on from the European Commission’s proposed revision of the TEN-E Regulation in the latter half of 2020, EASE put forward a set of recommendations aiming at improving the legislative framework, better support renewable-based solutions, and contribute to the decarbonisation of the energy system.

The TEN-E Regulation should be significantly revised to better address the challenges and seize the opportunities in light of the European Union’s decarbonisation strategy. Flexibility solutions, and in particular energy storage, can play a key role: the regulation should recognise it and properly favour their uptakes.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

28.09.2020 /

A comprehensive European Approach to Energy Storage

A comprehensive European Approach to Energy Storage

Following the rapid deployments of energy storage solutions around Europe, energy storage is gaining momentum across various initiatives from the European Parliament and European Commission. On 9 September 2020, over 200 participants attended an EASE webinar presenting the European Parliament’s ITRE Committee Own-Initiative Report on energy storage.

The webinar gave valuable insights into the work behind the report from the perspective of the Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) who led the drafting of the report: Claudia Gamon (rapporteur, Renew Europe), Maria Spyraki (shadow-rapporteur, EPP), Ville Niinistö (shadow-rapporteur, Greens/EFA), and Niels Fuglsang (shadow-rapporteur, S&D). This was complemented by the European Commission, which presented its vision and policies for energy storage.

The report provides a comprehensive analysis of the solutions that EASE, as the voice of the energy storage industry, considers essential for the integration of renewables and for transitioning to an energy system in which people will have both clean energy and security of supply. EASE is happy to see that the report has taken a technology-neutral approach to ensure a level playing field for all energy storage solutions. This will allow market forces to foster innovation and to drive the choice of technology.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

24.09.2020 /

Response to the European Commission Public Consultation on the Sustainable and Smart Mobility Strategy

Response to the European Commission Public Consultation on the Sustainable and Smart Mobility Strategy

In September 2020, EASE submitted a response to the European Commission Public Consultation on the Sustainable and Smart Mobility Strategy.

The European Commission intends to adopt a comprehensive Strategy for a Sustainable and Smart Mobility, with the objectives of setting a pathway for the sector towards the sustainable and digital transition and building a resilient and crisis-proof transport system for generations to come. The Strategy aims to deliver on the ambition set out in “Europe Fit for the Digital Age Communications” and the “European Green Deal”, which includes a target to reduce transport-related greenhouse gas emissions by 90% by 2050.

The Commission’s objectives also include:

  • increasing the uptake of zero-emission vehicles;
  • making sustainable alternative solutions available to the public & businesses;
  • supporting digitalisation & automation;
  • improving connectivity & access.

EASE stands behind these objectives and believes that a sound EU strategy must appropriately value the role of energy storage in relation to mobility.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

28.07.2020 /

EASE Response to the ACER Public Consultation on the Statutory Documents of the EU DSO Entity

EASE Response to the ACER Public Consultation on the Statutory Documents of the EU DSO Entity

EASE submitted a response to the European Union Agency for the Cooperation of Energy Regulators (ACER) public consultation on the statutory documents of a new European body, the EU DSO entity.

EASE welcomes the establishment of an independent EU DSO entity and looks forward to working together on the flexibility market matters.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

13.07.2020 /

EASE Response to Public Consultation on the Revision of the Trans-European Energy Infrastructure Regulation

EASE Response to Public Consultation on the Revision of the Trans-European Energy Infrastructure Regulation

EASE submitted a response to the public consultation on the Revision of the Trans-European Energy Infrastructure Regulation (No. 347/2013).

With the unveiling of the European Green Deal in late 2019, and the emphasis on the move towards smart integration in energy systems, it has become clear that a number of European legislative instruments are in need for an amendment in order to take in the broader scope of technologies as well as an increase of renewable energy in the mix.

The Trans-European energy infrastructure regulation (or “TEN-E” Regulation) deals with the interoperability and development of cross-border energy infrastructures, and aims to remove barriers across the continent in order to facilitate interconnected energy markets. The European Commission and the Council have jointly agreed to evaluate both the Connecting Europe Facility (the section of the EU budget dedicated to cross-border energy infrastructure projects, as well as other transnational elements) and the effectiveness of TEN-E.

From EASE’s point of view, the TEN-E Regulation should be significantly revised to better address the challenges and seize the opportunities in light of the European Union’s decarbonisation strategy. Energy storage can play a key role in the future energy system – it is paramount that the TEN-E fully recognise its role.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

30.06.2020 /

EASE Response to the Public Consultation on the Revision of the Directive on the Deployment of Alternative Fuels Infrastructure

EASE Response to the Public Consultation on the Revision of the Directive on the Deployment of Alternative Fuels Infrastructure

EASE submitted a response to the European Commission’s public consultation on the Revision of the Directive 2014/94/EU on the Deployment of Alternative Fuels Infrastructure (AFID). 

Following the policy ambition set out by the European Green Deal for the EU to become a climate neutral economy by 2050, transport emissions have to decrease by 90% by that year.

Recharging and refuelling infrastructure need to be ready to meet the demand for sustainable alternative fuels in all modes of transport.

Directive 2014/94/EU on deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure (AFID) was adopted in 2014 to ensure a common framework of measures for the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure in Member States. The central means are national policy frameworks that Member States had to adopt in 2016. Moreover, the Directive sets technical specifications for the interoperability of infrastructure. However, alternative fuels infrastructure is not available evenly across the EU. Member States’ national policy frameworks under Directive 2014/94/EU show, on average, a lack of ambition to ensure adequate rollout and easy cross-border usability in the critical period post 2020.

The European Commission is inviting the public and stakeholders to express their opinion and share information on the impact of the existing Directive as well as on possible measures and potential impacts of its revision. EASE believes this a great opportunity to present the EASE position on how the transport sector can be decarbonised thanks to a.o. energy storage solutions.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

30.06.2020 /

EASE Response to the European Commission Public Consultation on the 2030 Climate Target Plan

EASE Response to the European Commission Public Consultation on the 2030 Climate Target Plan

EASE submitted a response to the European Commission’s public consultation on the 2030 Climate Target Plan

The energy storage industry is committed to supporting a socially just and cost-effective energy transition with high levels of ambition. The 2030 Climate Target Plan should send clear signals to investors and industry, especially given the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.

EASE’s key recommendations:

  • Increase the EU’s 2030 target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions domestically to at least 55% compared to 1990. This is essential in order to speed up Member States’ efforts to achieve climate neutrality by 2050.
  • More ambitious climate policy brings with it many opportunities: improving energy security and reducing dependency on imported fossil fuels; creating new green jobs; lowering pollution, improving health, and increasing well-being of citizens; and mitigating costs associated with climate change to society. Increased climate ambition will strengthen investor confidence, allowing the EU to mobilise more resources for the energy transition. This is important given the economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic; a higher 2030 target sends a strong message regarding the commitment to a green recovery.
  • The benefits associated with higher climate ambition clearly outweigh potential drawbacks. Although reaching higher 2030 targets represents an investment challenge for EU industry, this will ultimately lead to savings for consumers. However, in order to deliver on an ambitious 2030 Climate Target Plan, the EU and Member States must work together to implement rapidly the Clean Energy for All Europeans Package and support investments in enabling technologies including energy storage.
  • Energy storage can support decarbonisation of sectors across the economy, enabling them to reach higher ambition levels:
    • Energy supply: achieving a higher penetration of renewable energy, electrification of final energy use, and better integration of the gas, heating and cooling, and electricity sectors will be essential to decarbonise energy supply. Energy storage has a very important role to play in each of these areas.
    • Mobility/transport: increasing uptake of clean vehicles (EVs and FCEVs), incentivising sustainable consumer choices and low-emission mobility practices, and increasing investment in sustainable transport infrastructure and solutions.
    • Buildings (both residential and commercial): maximising self-consumption of variable renewables (e.g. by coupling solar PV with batteries or integrating thermal energy storage) and decarbonising heating & cooling are important actions that the Renovation Wave and related EU policy measures should target. Policies related to buildings should also enable consumers to provide flexibility to the system by participating in various markets.
  • The energy transition must be just and socially balanced. The EU should support actions including energy system modernisation (focusing on increasing flexibility and increasing renewable energy deployment) and re-skilling workers currently specialised in greenhouse gas intensive sectors. Energy storage should be explicitly considered in the Just Transition Fund and associated policy measures, given its role in supporting renewables deployment.
  • Research, innovation, and deployment should prioritise investments in energy storage, alongside renewable energy deployment, sustainable and smart mobility, and the broader hydrogen economy.

 

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

25.06.2020 /

Energy Storage Applications Summary

Energy Storage Applications Summary

This overview provides a summary of the different energy storage applications, focused mainly on the electricity system, in order to illustrate the many services that energy storage can provide. The forms are organised according to the segment of the energy system that benefits from a given service; this categorisation does not necessarily reflect the location in which the storage device is installed. The terms for individual services, as well as their maturity (existing service vs emerging or future service) varies across different EU Member States:

  • Services to Support Generation/Services to Support Bulk Storage
  • Ancillary Services
  • Services to Support Transmission Infrastructure
  • Services to Support Distribution Infrastructure
  • Services to Support Customer Energy Management
02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

01.06.2020 /

Power-to-Gas Business Cases: Revenue Streams, Economic and Regulatory Barriers, Business Opportunities

Power-to-Gas Business Cases: Revenue Streams, Economic and Regulatory Barriers, Business Opportunities

The European Commission (EC) has set out a European Green Deal that aims to tackle climate and environmental challenges, among others the energy transition. A key aspect of this Green Deal is the decarbonisation of the Gas sector and market. To achieve this decarbonisation, the EC has launched different studies identifying and assessing the regulatory barriers that could potentially limit sector coupling and deployment of renewable and low-carbon gases.

In response to the EC initiative, EASE has decided to develop a paper outlining the main business opportunities for Power-to-Gas, as well as the barriers that could obstruct the wider deployment of Power-to-Gas in the EU. EASE also provides a set of recommendations for policymakers to support the Power-to-Gas business case.

Hydrogen and Power-to-Gas (PtG) are chemical energy storage technologies, one of five energy storage technology ‘families’ identified by EASE. Electricity-produced hydrogen can be used for transport (fuel), for heating (fuel), as a raw material (chemical feedstock); to balance electricity demand & supply and to support the management of the electricity grid (through storage).

EU policymakers have recognised the promising role that hydrogen can play to decarbonise high-value end- uses, such as part of the industrial applications and very heavy-duty transport. Seasonal storage could be another key driver.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

27.05.2020 /

Energy Storage in Ukraine – Upcoming Regulatory Changes and New Opportunities

Energy Storage in Ukraine – Upcoming Regulatory Changes and New Opportunities

Ukraine is the biggest country in Europe by area, with a population of forty-two million people, and has one of the oldest, most centralised, most inflexible energy systems in Europe. Despite these challenges, Ukraine can decarbonise its energy system by embarking on an ambitious green energy transition agenda.

The Ukrainian government, supported by key industry players such as the local TSO, is eager to take on this important challenge: the country has signed the Paris Agreement; it has decided to support the European Green Deal; and it aims to have 80% of RES in the energy mix by 2050.

The ultimate goal is to transition to a carbon-neutral economy by 2070. Especially in the first months of 2020, the Ukrainian Government has increased its commitment to a greener energy system. Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, moreover, the Government does not plan to change its strategy. With the contribution of energy storage, Ukraine can achieve a greener, decarbonised, decentralised energy system.

EASE, the European Association for Storage of Energy, and UESA, the Ukrainian Energy Storage Association, welcome these initiatives. The associations and their members, coming from Industry, research centres, and universities, aim to support Ukrainian stakeholders in this transition.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

27.05.2020 /

Future EU Strategy for Smart Sector Integration

Future EU Strategy for Smart Sector Integration

EASE submitted a response to the European Commission Public Consultation on Future EU Strategy for Smart Sector Integration.

EASE believes energy storage is a key instrument enabling a smart sector integration. In order to meet the climate objectives, while also guaranteeing secure and affordable energy for consumers, it is paramount to link up the energy system with other sectors and exploit the synergies enabled through an integrated energy system.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

30.04.2020 /

EASE Response to ENTSO-E Stakeholder Consultation on FCR CBA

EASE Response to ENTSO-E Stakeholder Consultation on FCR CBA

EASE submitted a response to the ENTSO-E stakeholder consultation on the “All CE and Nordic TSOs’ results of CBA in accordance with Art.156(11) of the Commission Regulation (EU) 2017/1485 of 2 August 2017” report. 

EASE welcomes the efforts of ENTSO-E and the TSOs of the CE and Nordic synchronous areas to propose assumptions and methodology for the CBA to be conducted, in order to assess the time period required for FCR providing units or groups with limited energy reservoirs to remain available during alert state.

EASE supports setting Tmin for FCR providers with LER to 15 minutes, however, EASE notes that the methodology itself should be re-assessed before it is possible to carry out the CBA and based on that, to discuss the results. Therefore, EASE would like to draw the attention to the number of assumptions and design choices in the methodology leading to biased results in disadvantage of FCR units with limited energy reservoir, both coming from the methodology and CBA.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

29.04.2020 /

Energy Storage and the Alternative Fuels Infrastructure Directive

Energy Storage and the Alternative Fuels Infrastructure Directive

In 2013, the European Commission (EC) Communication “Clean Power for Transport: A European Alternative Fuels Strategy” stressed the need to reduce Europe’s dependence on oil imports from third countries. In pursuit of this objective, the Communication identifies electricity, hydrogen, biofuels, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas as alternative fuels (AFs) which can act as a substitute for oil in the transport sector. The Commission’s Communication advocated for the development of AF infrastructure to support the market uptake of alternative vehicles. As a consequence, the Alternative Fuels Infrastructure Directive was adopted in 2014. It requires, among others, that Member States assess the current and future development of the AF market and set national targets for recharging infrastructure.

The 2050 long-term decarbonisation strategy, published by the European Commission in 2018, assesses different pathways for the EU to achieve greenhouse gas emissions reductions starting from 80% reduction and going up to net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. To reduce emissions and meet its 2050 targets, we believe that the EU should intensify its efforts in promoting net-zero transport solutions, since the transport sector is the only EU sector in which greenhouse gas emissions have risen since 1990. To this end, the Alternative Fuels Infrastructure (AFI) Directive should exclusively focus on new emerging transport means, mainly BEVs and FCEVs, in order to support the 2050 decarbonisation targets.

E-mobility is one of the key options to decarbonise the transport sector, and it can be complemented by other solutions that rely on existing supply infrastructures, such as synthetic green fuels, which can be produced large-scale at competitive costs.

As the representative of the energy storage industry in Europe, and as explained in EASE’s “Energy Storage for a Decarbonised Europe by 2050” paper, EASE is committed to supporting the transition to clean mobility. Stationary and mobile storage can play an important role in facilitating the rapid and efficient decarbonisation of the mobility sector. EASE’s position paper on energy storage and mobility introduced a number of general principles that should be implemented at EU level to support the roll-out of electric vehicles (EVs). It also explains how energy storage systems can reduce the cost of this roll-out by coupling the energy and transport sectors.

We believe that the role of energy storage in supporting the efficient roll-out of charging infrastructure should not be underestimated. In light of the foreseen evaluation of the AFI Directive, EASE is putting forward recommendations on how the Directive could be revised in order to address the current gaps in the legislation and support the further uptake of EVs, assisting in the decarbonisation of the European economy, and allowing energy storage to reach its full potential in terms of supporting EV deployment and integration into the grid. Electromobility can play a key role in meeting the EU’s new CO2 regulations for 2025 and 2030: it is paramount to design an appropriate legislative framework able to foster it.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

31.03.2020 /

Innovation Fund Technical Workshop on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Savings Methodology

Innovation Fund Technical Workshop on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Savings Methodology

The Innovation Fund is the European Union’s upcoming funding programme for the demonstration of innovative low-carbon technologies. The Innovation Fund is a key funding instrument for delivering the European Union’s commitments under the Paris Agreement. Energy Storage, a key enabler of the energy transition, will be one of the solutions this Fund will focus on.

On 5 February 2020 EASE, together, with the European Commission, organised a workshop to highlight how storage can contribute to its Vision of a Climate Neutral Europe by 2050. On 19 March 2020, EASE organised a follow-up technical online workshop on the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions savings methodology for the European Union’s Innovation Fund. This methodology will play a key role in the project selection process. EASE and its members believe the proposed methodology can be significantly improved: the formulas must appropriately value energy storage’s contribution to decarbonisation.

Mr Jakob Wachsmuth, Senior Researcher at Fraunhofer ISI, presented the proposed methodology to EASE members and selected representatives of the energy storage sector who had the possibility to directly engage in a discussion with the two actors behind its elaboration: the European Commission and Fraunhofer.

Several aspects of the GHG emissions savings methodology were touched upon during the workshop, but the discussion mainly revolved around three points. First, the energy storage services considered by the Fund methodology, an important subject as some key applications risk being left out. Secondly, the additionality principle (i.e. that electricity inputs are only considered renewable if they are additional to the renewable electricity that would be consumed anyway) was also discussed: its role in the Innovation Fund and the matter of how a project can be consistent with such principle were considered – different answers would lead to different projects being selected. Finally, the matter of how to calculate GHG emission intensity of the grid was also debated. A formula leading to very high grid GHG emission intensity would risk, among other things, making energy storage’s decarbonisation impact less significant, and might even render all electrolysis-based projects unfeasible.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

30.03.2020 /

EASE Study on Power System Challenges of Islands and Isolated Systems with High Shares of Variable Renewables

EASE Study on Power System Challenges of Islands and Isolated Systems with High Shares of Variable Renewables

The deployment of renewable energy, particularly variable renewables such as wind and solar PV, is expected to increase dramatically across Europe in the coming years. The EU institutions have set a target for renewable energy sources consumption of 32% by 2030.

To fulfil these aspirations, most power systems will have to deal with operational limitations that prevent large amounts of non-synchronous generation from being integrated into the energy mix at any given time. These limitations have already been identified by grid operators in islands in Europe, e.g. in Ireland, the UK, French overseas islands, and the Canary Islands; as well as overseas, e.g. in Australia and Texas (isolated system).

Island systems are interesting case studies, as they are the first to experience the challenges associated with high shares of non-synchronous generation. Since they tend to have limited to no interconnections, islands have to rely more on other flexibility options to ensure the secure and cost-efficient operation of their energy system: flexible thermal generation, demand-response, and energy storage. Indeed, islands have seen some of the first commercial deployments of energy storage systems, due to a clear business case.

The challenges faced by islands today can be highly instructive for interconnected energy systems, which will have to tackle the challenges of integrating high shares of variable renewables in the coming decades. EASE has therefore produced a study of some of the key power system challenges faced by islands today, which will be accompanied by an analysis of some of the solutions from the energy storage sector.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

23.03.2020 /

EMMES 4.0 - March 2020

EMMES 4.0 – March 2020

EASE and Delta-ee are pleased to announce the publication of the fourth edition of the European Market Monitor on Energy Storage (EMMES).

EMMES 4.0 shows that:

  • The European energy storage market contracted in 2019 to 1 GWh, with a cumulative installed base of 3.4 GWh across all segments.
  • In 2019 saturated FCR markets in the UK and Germany slowed growth in the Front of Meter segment. We expect a rebound in 2020 as the demand for system flexibility rises and value streams open.
  • The residential segment continues to grow steadily, driven by growth in Germany that accounted for 76% of the annual market in 2019.
  • The C&I segment saw a small contraction in the leading markets (Germany and the UK) in 2019. Regulatory uncertainty and long payback periods are hindering growth.
  • However, the future of energy storage in 2020 in Europe remains positive as the energy transition progresses.
  • Regulators and grid operators are increasingly recognising the value that storage adds to electricity systems. Consumers in both the residential and C&I segments show growing interest in storage as technology costs fall and Feed in Tariffs are phased out. And the storage industry continues to innovate around products and propositions.
  • The EU’s Clean Energy Package is already opening doors for storage, and this process will only accelerate over the coming years as regulations stabilise.

 

EMMES 4.0 is now available for 5.000 Euro.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

13.03.2020 /

EASE Activity Report 2019

EASE Activity Report 2019

2019, what a year! In the past twelve months, we have witnessed a big leap forward for energy storage. Just a few years ago, energy storage was looked at with curiosity and, in some corners, scepticism: could this “new kid on the block” demonstrate an added value to the system? We can now say: yes, it can. Energy storage is now recognised by policymakers and industry as a central element of the energy transition.

Naturally, EASE aims to capitalise on this positive momentum by doubling down on our efforts to have the role of energy storage recognised at the local, national, and European level. The Clean Energy Package will be implemented in 2020 across all EU Member States, so EASE will carefully watch the process and support decisionmakers in implementing the storage-related provisions. And, of course, 2020 will be the year of the European Green Deal, the ambitious plan from the new EU Commission President von der Leyen to green Europe. EASE fully supports the EU’s efforts to achieve a net-zero emissions power system by 2050, and endorses raising the 2030 greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets. We believe energy storage can play an important role in the European Green Deal, which is why we will focus in 2020 on discussions with policymakers at EU and Member State level on how storage can help achieve these ambitious aims.

 

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

07.02.2020 /

EASE - European Commission Innovation Fund Workshop

EASE – European Commission Innovation Fund Workshop

On 5 February 2020, over 90 participants attended, in person or via webinar, the EASE – European Commission Innovation Fund Workshop to discuss one of Europe’s most ambitious funding programmes for demonstration of innovative low-carbon technologies with high-level European Commission officers.

The Innovation Fund is a key funding instruments for delivering the EU’s economy-wide commitments under the Paris Agreement and supporting the European Commission’s strategic vision of a climate neutral Europe by 2050.

The Innovation Fund focuses on:

  • Innovative low-carbon technologies and processes in energy intensive industries, including products
    substituting carbon intensive ones
  • Carbon capture and utilisation (CCU)
  • Construction and operation of carbon capture and storage (CCS)
  • Innovative renewable energy generation
  • Energy storage
02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

30.01.2020 /

EASE Inputs on Battery Sustainability and Ecodesign

EASE Inputs on Battery Sustainability and Ecodesign

Energy storage technologies are essential for both sustainable mobility and the integration of increasing shares of renewable energy sources into the energy system while maintaining an efficient and secure operation of the grid. Different policy measures are needed to promote the research, development, and deployment of all energy storage technologies, including batteries: R&D funding must be directed towards this challenge and the energy market design must create a level playing field for all technologies.

For batteries in particular, it is important also to develop requirements on ethical sourcing of raw materials as well as strict sustainability requirements (e.g. touching on durability, low carbon footprint, reusability, recyclability of batteries, etc).

EASE supports efforts by EU policymakers to bolster the manufacturing and deployment of safe and sustainable battery technologies across the EU and believes that a proposal for sustainability requirements could have a positive impact on the industry. However, a transparent dialogue between policymakers, industry, and other stakeholders is crucial to ensure that the proposals are practical, feasible, and technology neutral.

First EASE inputs on this topic have already been provided in the reply to the Commission’s Consultation on Sustainability Requirements for Batteries.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

25.11.2019 /

Energy Storage on Islands

Energy Storage on Islands

On 21 November, over 80 participants met during the EASE Energy Storage on Islands Workshop to learn about the latest advances in energy storage technologies, assess the energy storage applications and business cases on islands, and propose policy recommendations to ensure a faster roll-out of innovative solutions to support the island decarbonisation agenda.

Islands face unique challenges in terms of ensuring a secure and cost-effective energy supply. Many islands have been early adopters of renewables and have seen some of the world’s first deployments of energy storage projects. These projects not only showcase the diversity of storage technologies and applications, but also highlight some of the most pressing challenges when it comes to the energy transition and deep decarbonisation.

The workshop kicked off with a focus on the main challenges and opportunities for decarbonisation of islands, both from a policy and technical point of view. Gianni Chianetta, Director of Greening the Islands, noted that this is the perfect time to focus on the role of storage, since the 2017 Political Declaration on Clean Energy for EU Islands is expected to be updated under the Croatian Presidency of the EU in 2020.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

21.11.2019 /

Energy Storage for a Decarbonised Europe by 2050

Energy Storage for a Decarbonised Europe by 2050

EASE fully supports the European Commission President-Elect Ursula von der Leyen’s proposal for a European Green Deal.

We believe that a range of concrete policy measures are needed to support the achievement of ambitious decarbonisation targets, while supporting the competitiveness of European industry. These measures should aim at facilitating the transition to a renewables-based energy system supported by energy storage and other flexibility providers, in order to ensure security of supply, efficient energy system operation, and the competitiveness of EU industries.

Supporting the development and deployment of energy storage technologies should be a central element of the European Green Deal. Energy storage can provide much-needed flexibility across different timescales, which is essential to transition to a system dominated by variable renewables. Storage can be installed in consumers’ homes, commercial and industrial facilities, and at larger scale connected directly to the grid.

Therefore, energy storage has the potential to support decarbonisation and flexibility in many different locations of the grid, and can adapt very well to different energy mixes, demand profiles, and other attributes that differ across the EU Member States.

Energy storage is therefore a key element of the energy transition, supporting several key priorities of the European Green Deal:

  • Achieving ambitious 2050 and 2030 decarbonisation targets requires increased deployment of energy storage solutions, which can support a cost-effective transition by facilitating integration of high shares of variable renewables (vRES).
  • Investing in energy storage research, demonstration, and deployment is essential to support the EU’s global leadership in clean energy technologies.
  • Energy storage will support the energy transition across the entire EU and in particular, has the potential to facilitate the transition of industrial, coal, and energy intensive regions (since existing infrastructure can be upgraded or complemented with energy storage solutions), and islands (where energy storage allows reducing the use of costly imported fossil fuels).
  • Deployed behind-the-meter, energy storage can support energy efficiency and energy optimisation, as well as citizens’ engagement in and ownership of the energy transition.
  • Energy storage can support the decarbonisation of the mobility sector, helping achieve the EU’s zero-pollution ambition.
  • Energy storage can also increase overall system efficiency by enabling sector integration. Power-to-Gas and Power-to-Liquid technologies, by converting renewable and low-carbon electricity into other energy carriers, can contribute to the higher integration of vRES, bring additional and longer-duration flexibility to the energy system, and help in decarbonising the EU economy in line with the Paris Agreement.
02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

30.08.2019 /

EASE Response to the European Commission Public Consultation on the Establishment of a Smart Readiness Indicator for Buildings

EASE Response to the European Commission Public Consultation on the Establishment of a Smart Readiness Indicator for Buildings

EASE submitted a response to the European Commission’s public consultation on the Establishment of a Smart Readiness Indicator for Buildings.

The Smart Readiness Indicator (‘SRI’) will be used to measure the capacity of buildings to use information and communication technologies and electronic systems to adapt the operation of buildings to the needs of the occupants and the grid and to improve the energy efficiency and overall performance of buildings.

According to EASE, the SRI can play an invaluable role in raising awareness among consumers about smart energy and flexibility technologies, while also sending important investment signals to industry. It can help customers become more informed and active in the energy markets, one of the key priorities of the Clean Energy Package.

Energy storage technologies can provide many benefits to building owners, tenants, and users. This can apply to both residential buildings and commercial/industrial buildings, due to the diversity and scalability of storage technologies. Buildings with solar PV can benefit from installing energy storage (e.g. batteries) in order to maximise renewable self-consumption and provide grid flexibility. Thermal energy storage can help support renewable or low-carbon heating and cooling solutions such as heat pumps or solar-thermal panels, increasing efficiency and facilitating the provision of flexibility services.

Another important aspect of energy storage is its ability support the roll-out of electric vehicle charging infrastructure in buildings. Stationary storage co-located with charging infrastructure can reduce peaks in demand and facilitate smart charging in response to signals from the grid.

Since it has so many different applications, the benefits of storage cannot be fully captured only by one domain in the SRI. Energy storage can support heating, cooling, domestic hot water, on-side renewable energy generation, demand-side management and flexibility to the grid, as well as electric vehicle charging. The SRI should reflect all of the different benefits and potential roles of energy storage, both in the assessment of the SRI score for each building and in the report that is prepared for consumers with suggestions for actions to improve the score.

One point that is not adequately addressed in this consultation is the issue of interoperability. Different smart energy technologies must be able to interact with one another, as this will enhance the overall functioning of the building, allow consumers a wide array of choice between different technology providers, and facilitate the installation of various different technologies.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

09.08.2019 /

European Commission’s Sustainability Requirements for Batteries

European Commission’s Sustainability Requirements for Batteries

EASE submitted a response to the European Commission’s Public Consultation on Sustainability Requirements for Batteries.

Battery technologies play a key role in decarbonising the road transport sector and strongly contribute to energy storage solutions, both for domestic and grid applications. Their large-scale deployment has the potential to make a substantial contribution to the Energy Union and sustainable mobility policies. At the same time, the production and use of batteries can induce negative environmental impacts, notably in terms of energy and resource use.

EASE endorses policymakers’ efforts to ensure that the EU develops a strong battery value chain and to facilitate the deployment of energy storage technologies.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

05.06.2019 /

Recommendations on Certification of Renewable and Low-Carbon Hydrogen

Recommendations on Certification of Renewable and Low-Carbon Hydrogen

Power-to-gas (PtG) and power-to-liquid (PtL) technologies are a key enabler of sector integration. By converting renewable and low-carbon electricity into other energy carriers, PtG and PtL facilities can contribute to the higher integration of vRES, introduce additional flexibility to the energy system, and help in the decarbonisation of the EU economy in line with the Paris agreement.

The upcoming revision of the ‘Gas Package’ presents a unique opportunity for the EU to clarify the regulatory framework applicable to PtG and PtL facilities and to create a supportive environment for the development and deployment of these technologies. In light of this, EASE has prepared some key recommendations for the certification of hydrogen produced through PtG, which we invite the EU institutions to consider.

PtG and PtL allow using electricity to produce renewable and/or low-carbon Hydrogen (H2) and other energy carriers. In this sense, PtG and PtL are key enabling technologies for the development of sector coupling1 as they contribute to integrating different energy infrastructures and vectors.

In this document, we will focus solely on hydrogen produced through PtG (i.e. by electrolysis), thereby making recommendations on its certification based on the nature of the electricity used in the electrolysis process. Other technologies to produce hydrogen such as Steam Methane Reforming (SMR) are not considered in this paper.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

21.05.2019 /

Open Letter Addressing Energy Storage in the National Energy and Climate Plans

Open Letter Addressing Energy Storage in the National Energy and Climate Plans

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is the voice of the energy storage community, representing companies and organisations from across the entire value chain. EASE promotes the deployment of energy storage technologies in order to meet the EU’s ambitious decarbonisation objectives while enhancing the flexibility and security of the energy system.

Energy storage can bring numerous benefits to the energy system:

  • It supports the integration of variable renewable energy sources into the energy system by helping balance supply and demand across different timescales.
  • Energy storage can play a crucial role in increasing the stability and reliability of the electricity network by providing a wide range of system and ancillary services.
  • It can act as a complement to grid development, allowing network operators to defer or even avoid investments in transmission and distribution grids.
  • It can also aid in decarbonising the heating and cooling and transport sectors.

At EU level, the growing importance of storage was emphasised throughout the whole “Clean Energy for All Europeans” Package, which clarified the regulatory framework for energy storage. In addition, the Commission’s long-term strategic vision for a prosperous, modern, competitive and climate neutral economy clearly recognises storage as having a key role in achieving the EU’s 2050 decarbonisation goals. It foresees a significant expansion of storage capacities in the future.

We believe that the National Energy and Climate Plans (NECPs) are an excellent opportunity for Member States to examine the current status of energy storage deployment, assess future flexibility needs, and identify the biggest barriers to storage deployment. Developing a clear strategy to support the development and deployment of storage technologies is essential in order for Member States to achieve their decarbonisation targets for 2030 and beyond.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

06.05.2019 /

How to Kick-Start Energy Storage Deployment

How to Kick-Start Energy Storage Deployment

Over the past several years, EU policymakers have taken important steps towards creating a regulatory framework that is supportive of energy storage. Advocacy by EASE and players from across the energy storage sector has led energy storage to be widely recognised as a key enabling technology for the energy transition.

With the upcoming EU elections, EASE would like to ensure that the European institutions continue to foster the development and deployment of energy storage technologies across Europe. Especially with the recent approval of the Clean Energy for All Europeans Package and the ongoing discussions about the EU’s 2050 Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Strategy, it is crucial to build on what has been achieved so far.

To this end, EASE members have developed a list of 10 points to kick-start energy storage in Europe, translated into all major European languages. The list reflects the expectations of energy storage stakeholders on the progress that still needs to be made if we want to reach the levels of storage deployment that will be needed to achieve the 2030 and 2050 renewable and decarbonisation targets. This action list is directed at everyone, specialists and non-specialists alike, with the goal of increasing awareness and knowledge about the importance of energy storage and stating what needs to be further improved in terms of policy.

EASE would like to thank all of its members who participated in the internal consultation directed at drafting – and sometimes translating – this document, and looks forward to working with EU policymakers and other stakeholders to achieve a flexible, secure, and efficient energy system.

Here are the 10 points:

 

EASE would like to thank all of its members who participated in the internal consultation directed at drafting –and sometimes translating– this document, and looks forward to work towards the achievement of all these actions.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

05.04.2019 /

Maximising Social Welfare of Energy Storage Facilities through Multi-Service Business Cases

Maximising Social Welfare of Energy Storage Facilities through Multi-Service Business Cases

In November 2018, the European Commission presented its strategic long-term vision for a prosperous, modern, competitive and climate-neutral economy by 2050, which seeks to establish a vision on how the EU can deliver on the Paris Agreement. The strategy assesses different pathways for the EU to achieve greenhouse gas emissions reductions between -80% by 2050 (compared to 1990) up to net zero greenhouse emissions by 2050.

All scenarios developed by the European Commission converge on one element: storage capacity will significantly increase to enable integration of higher shares of variable RES in a faster, more efficient way. Total stationary storage used in the power system (i.e. pumped hydro storage, stationary batteries and chemical storage, including the indirect storage effects of producing e-fuels for the final consumers) is expected to reach between 250 TWh to 450 TWh by 2050.1

This strong increase in energy storage demand raises questions: how will the market evolve to cope with the need for storage, how will storage services be remunerated, and how can this added value from energy storage be maximised?

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

29.03.2019 /

European Investment Bank’s Energy Lending Policy

European Investment Bank’s Energy Lending Policy

EASE submitted a response to the European Investment Bank’s Public Consultation on the EIB Energy Lending Policy.

The consultation examines how future EIB backed investment can reduce energy consumption through energy efficiency, better support renewable power generation, improve financial and advisory backing for energy innovation and secure infrastructure essential for energy transition.

Energy storage is recognised in the ‘Clean Energy for All Europeans’ package as one of the key building blocks of the energy transition. Storage is essential to integrate rapidly increasing shares of variable renewable energy sources (RES) along the entire value chain – from generation to consumption – while ensuring system stability, efficiency, and the active participation of consumers. Moreover, energy storage can support the decarbonisation of the mobility, gas, heating, and cooling sectors by enabling sector coupling. The importance of energy storage and other flexibility technologies should be further emphasised.

EASE supports a technology neutral approach, wherever possible, with regards to energy storage technologies. This should be considered in the EIB’s energy lending policy, instead of only focusing on batteries.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

11.03.2019 /

EMMES 3.0 - March 2019

EMMES 3.0 – March 2019

EASE and Delta-ee are pleased to announce the publication of the third edition of the European Market Monitor on Energy Storage (EMMES).

EMMES 3.0 shows that:

  • Market growth in 2018 exceeded expectations, and was higher than both 2016 and 2017
  • A key factor in this rapid market growth during 2018 was the commissioning of new front-of-the meter projects in the UK
  • Behind-the-meter markets continue to develop positively across Europe, with growing opportunities for energy storage in C&I and residential applications in Central & Eastern Europe, Spain and the Nordics.
  • Political negotiations on the “Clean Energy for All Europeans” package (CEP) were concluded in December 2018, and the new electricity market design should be enacted into Member States national legislation over the next 18 months. This promises to deliver important changes that could have a significant and positive impact on the energy storage market in Europe.
  • While the market is forecast to grow in 2019 and 2020, it will do so at a lower rate due to the short-term saturation of some front-of-the-meter markets, and the maturing of the large German residential market.
  • However, new growth drivers will emerge as the CEP is enacted and we expect E-mobility to become a significant new application for stationary energy storage.

Watch the webinar

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

06.03.2019 /

EASE Activity Report 2018

EASE Activity Report 2018

2018 was another incredibly productive and exciting year for EASE. Energy storage deployment has continued to accelerate at an astonishing pace across Europe. As our Storage4EU campaign demonstrated, storage is not a promising technology for the future – it is a proven technology that is already being deployed at scale in diverse configurations around the world. The technological developments and innovative approaches in the storage sector show no signs of stopping anytime soon.

Energy storage has clearly come a very long way from being the ‘new kid on the block’. Still, we have a very long way to go before storage can achieve its full market potential. In terms of technical innovation, energy market design, and regulation for energy storage, there is still much progress to be made. EASE, with the support of its members, will continue to drive progress by advocating on behalf of the European energy storage sector.

 

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

19.02.2019 /

Energy Storage: A Key Enabler for the Decarbonisation of the Transport Sector

Energy Storage: A Key Enabler for the Decarbonisation of the Transport Sector

The transport sector is the only EU sector in which greenhouse gas emissions have risen since 1990. To reduce these emissions and meet its long-term decarbonisation goals, the EU is focusing on electrifying the transport sector, based on renewable energy sources, through Battery Electric Vehicles (BEVs) and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles (FCEVs).

Electrifying the transport sector will create new consumption patterns and business models but could also impose significant stress and costs on the electricity system if left unmanaged. EASE’s position paper on energy storage and mobility introduces general principles that should be implemented at EU level to support the roll-out of Electric Vehicles (EVs). It also explains how energy storage systems can reduce the cost of this roll-out by coupling the energy and transport sectors.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

14.01.2019 /

European Commission's Delegated Regulation Establishing the Innovation Fund

European Commission’s Delegated Regulation Establishing the Innovation Fund

EASE submitted a response to the European Commission’s Public Consultation on the “European Commission’s Delegated Regulation establishing the Innovation Fund”.

The EC legislative proposal for a revised EU emissions trading system (ETS) reform involves the creation of an Innovation Fund (IF). This fund is meant to support low-carbon innovative technologies, including energy storage technologies, by allocating funds to demonstration projects or projects between TRLs 6-9. It will be financed through the earmarking of revenues from the sale ETS allowances.

EASE comments:

  • The draft regulation provides a long and non-exhaustive list of eligible storage technologies. However, we noticed that pumped hydro storage (PHS) is the only mainstream storage technology not included in the list. The development of storage technologies is critical to reach the EU ETS targets. According to the EU-funded e-Storage project, the untapped potential of PHS (using existing reservoirs) is 2,291 GWh in EU15+Norway and Switzerland. Innovation in PHS can offer the energy system a great amount of high energy storage capacity at a competitive cost, without the need for scarce elements (Li, Co), and recycling problems at the end of life time. We would therefore suggest including PHS in the list of storage technologies.
  • We strongly believe that the Innovation Fund should also look at the whole technology lifecycle and therefore take into account the global warming potential (GWP) of technologies and their end of life. Some technologies could indeed provide higher greenhouse gas (GHG) avoidance during operation while having higher energy intensity when manufactured than others. A wider approach based on the GWP would therefore be welcome to better assess the environmental impact of eligible technologies.
  • We were very pleased to read that the draft Innovation Fund Regulation recognises the importance of various storage technologies for decarbonisation. However, we understand that the criteria to evaluate projects, including storage projects, are based on cost efficiency and GHG avoidance over ten years. This approach is not technology neutral since it gives an advantage to storage technologies with lower Levelised Cost of Storage (LCOS) over storage technologies which have a competitive LCOS and are more efficient over 30 years, such as liquid air energy storage. These technologies have a great potential to decarbonise the system over a longer duration (weekly, seasonal storage) but require also further demonstration. Considering their complementary contribution to decarbonising the EU economy, all storage technologies should be treated on a level playing field.
02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

08.10.2018 /

Strategy for Long-Term EU Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reductions

Strategy for Long-Term EU Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reductions

EASE submitted a response to the European Commission’s Public Consultation on the Strategy for Long-Term EU Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reductions.

Our members are fully supportive of the EU’s efforts to achieve a low-carbon economy, and we support ambitious greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets.

Energy storage deployment can facilitate the transition to a low-carbon energy system in many ways, e.g. by:

  • Enabling higher shares of RES in the energy mix
  • Supporting electrification of the heating, cooling, and transport sectors
  • Supporting the secure, cost-effective, and efficient operation of the grid by providing key services at all levels of the energy system
  • Extending the lifetime of existing grid assets
  • Allowing active consumers to optimise self-consumption or provision of services to the grid
  • Ensuring security of supply: avoiding PV and wind curtailment avoids importing fuel
  • Enabling a faster energy transition on islands and in isolated areas

We hope that the long-term EU greenhouse gas emissions reductions strategy will take into account the vital role of storage.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

01.10.2018 /

Storage4EU

Storage4EU

A decade ago, energy storage – with the exception of pumped hydro storage – was viewed as a niche technology with limited applications. It was considered too costly and largely unnecessary, as there was little need for flexibility in a system run on dispatchable thermal generation. Energy storage has since grown in leaps and bounds, while the energy system has undergone dramatic transformations. The installed capacity of variable renewables – mainly wind and solar – increased by roughly 70% between 2005 and 2015. Cost declines and ambitious deployment targets mean that renewables will continue to be deployed around Europe. Digitisation and decentralisation have also contributed to fundamental changes in how the energy system operates.

The widespread deployment of renewables increases the need for flexibility at all timescales in the system. Energy storage – along with other solutions such as demand-side response, grid extension, and flexible thermal generation – can help the system cope with increasing shares of renewables. As its value for the system has grown, many storage technologies have experienced significant cost reduction and efficiency improvements, as well as innovations in business models and applications.

Today, energy storage is considered one of the key ingredients of the low-carbon energy system, characterised by very high shares of renewables, decentralisation, citizens’ participation, and digitisation. Storage can not only help the electricity system cope with higher shares of renewables, it can also help decarbonise the heating, cooling, and transport sectors through sector integration.

In Storage4EU, we are showcasing some of the most innovative and inspiring storage projects supporting the energy transition while ensuring a stable, secure, and affordable operation of our electricity grids.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

01.10.2018 /

EASE Solar+Storage Position Paper

EASE Solar+Storage Position Paper

One of the main aims of the “Clean Energy for All Europeans” Package, issued by the European Commission in November 2016, is to place customers at the centre of the energy transition. The Package empowers customers by giving them the possibility to produce, store, use, and sell their own electricity and be able to contribute to grid stability. The proposals also aim to foster the deployment of energy storage technologies at all levels of the energy system to support the transition to a sustainable and efficient energy system. This is a major step forward compared to the Third Energy Package of 2009, in which energy storage was not mentioned at all.

In particular, the new article of the proposed Renewable Energy directive on national support schemes for electricity generated from renewable sources states that such support should be provided in a form that is as non-distortive as possible for the functioning of electricity markets. This means that energy storage deployment is expected to no longer be discouraged by the use of distorting feed-in tariffs.

Depending on the tariff and regulatory conditions, energy storage devices can provide a variety of services at all levels of the energy system, including in residential consumers’ premises. Small-scale energy storage technologies can be used to optimise self-consumption of solar PV at the residential and community level and enable active consumers to participate fully in electricity markets. Moreover, depending on the regulatory and tariff conditions, energy storage at this level may lead to higher energy system efficiency.

The profitability of residential solar + storage systems depends on the cost of the system, the technical performance of the battery or thermal storage system, the generation and demand profile of the household, grid tariffs and charges, and the regulatory framework1.

Customers have access to an increasingly wide range of energy storage solutions, including stationary solutions such as batteries (lead-acid, Li-ion, flow, etc.) or thermal storage systems, as well as mobile solutions such as electric vehicles. Other small-scale storage solutions could emerge in the future. New business models are being developed and deployed, allowing consumers to access new revenue streams.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

17.09.2018 /

The Future of Energy Storage in the EU

The Future of Energy Storage in the EU

In the framework of the Electricity Coordination Group, which gathers electricity experts from each Member State, EASE submitted a response to the European Commission’s Public Consultation on the future of energy storage in the European Union.

Energy storage technologies are playing a valuable role in the transition to a low-carbon energy system. In the future energy system characterised by very high shares of variable renewables and electrification of heating, cooling, and transport, energy storage will be fundamental to ensure a stable, secure, and efficient operation of the
energy system.

EASE welcomes the efforts of the EU institutions to support the deployment of energy storage. Some key actions should be carried out by the EU institutions to further boost storage deployments:

  • Working on the implementation of the Clean Energy Package:
    • Making sure that energy storage is covered by the network codes and that technical specificities of storage technologies are recognised.
    • Assessing how the provisions regarding ownership of storage by regulated entities could be applied in the most cost-effective way. Could regulated entities and market players make contractual arrangements that would reconcile, on the one hand, compliance with competition rules and, on the other hand, shared ownership and/or the operation of an energy storage facility?
  • Promoting the development of appropriate market products, reflecting new needs arising from higher shares of intermittent renewables. Markets should be designed in such a way that they will enable energy storage to participate without any unjustified barrier. To support the market-based development of the energy storage sector, the EU regulatory framework should enable revenue stacking: enabling a storage facility to provide various services to various stakeholders (generators, consumers, network operators) and ‘stack’ multiple revenues, therefore improving the business case for storage.
  • Encouraging and facilitating by all means innovative and experimental implementation of energy storage solutions, provided those support future flexibility and stability needs of the electricity system. It is crucial to give the largest possible freedom to storage owners/operators as well as to offtakers of storage services (including regulated entities) in order to experiment innovative operation and remuneration schemes.
  • Further promoting sectoral integration:
    • Following-up on High-Level Roundtable on Sectorial Integration
    • Recognising the importance of storage in decarbonising the transport, heating and cooling sectors, e.g. in the Strategy for long-term EU greenhouse gas emissions reductions in accordance with the Paris Agreement
  • Supporting energy storage RD&D funding:
    • Horizon Europe
    •  Connecting Europe Facility
    • ETS Innovation Fund
  • Encouraging a dedicated debate on grid charges/fees/tariffs applied to storage facilities. Coordination at EU level is sorely needed, and it merits discussion whether and to what extent storage should contribute to grid costs, given that storage usually alleviates grid constraints.
02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

26.06.2018 /

EMMES 2.0 - June 2018

EMMES 2.0 – June 2018

EASE and Delta-ee are pleased to announce the publication of the second edition of the European Market Monitor on Energy Storage (EMMES).

EMMES 2.0 shows that:

  • The electrical energy storage capacity annually installed grew by 49% between 2016 and 2017 in Europe, which is a steady growth rate since 2015. In 2018it is expected to grow at a similar rate (45%) with the level of new installations accelerating
  • The total installed base in Europe (excluding pumped hydro) reached 1.6 GWh at end of 2017
  • Germany and UK remain the most important markets for grid scale projects
  • Italy is emerging as a rapidly growing market for residential electrical energy storage but Germany remains a clear leader.

Watch the webinar

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

05.06.2018 /

EASE Study on Storage Demand

EASE Study on Storage Demand

In this study, EASE seeks to analyse the demand for energy storage systems. EASE defines energy storage as follows: “’energy storage’ means, in the electricity system, deferring an amount of the electricity that was produced to the moment of use, either as final energy or converted into another energy carrier.” This definition encompasses Power-to-Gas, Power-to-Heat/Cold, and Power-to-Liquid technologies, recognising that they can support the dynamic operation of the electricity grid with thermal, fuel or gas as flexibility for downward regulation.

The demand for energy storage is assessed in many studies on the basis of targets for renewable energy supply. These studies give evidence of storage demand on different time scales that are required in order to achieve a certain degree of renewable generation for the electricity supply. Storage demand studies differ from market outlook studies since they seek to quantify the technical need for energy storage, rather than estimating the future market for energy storage systems. This kind of assessment of energy storage demand on the basis of technical necessity, however, does not answer the crucial question of whether the needed energy storage capacity can economically be built in the existing market design environment.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

13.04.2018 /

EASE Activity Report 2017

EASE Activity Report 2017

“As 2018 is moving along, I have one wish: for 2018 to be successful, fruitful, and rewarding as 2017! Indeed, after the signature of the Paris Agreement in 2016, I saw mind-sets changing. A growing number of businesses of all sizes, policymakers and citizens express now a genuine interest in energy storage, concerned with ensuring a smooth, efficient, and cost-effective energy transition.

I also witnessed the evolution of energy storage on European markets. From a niche market, energy storage has become a significant component of the Europe’s energy economic activity, as demonstrated by the first edition of the European Market Monitor on Energy Storage that EASE together with Delta-ee released in December 2017. Inspired by this momentum, EASE worked on many different fronts to inform decision makers and stakeholders on the role and value of energy storage, and to support and finance research, development, and deployment of energy storage.”

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

11.04.2018 /

Establishment of the ETS Innovation Fund

Establishment of the ETS Innovation Fund

EASE submitted a response to the European Commission Public Consultation on the “Establishment of the ETS Innovation Fund”.

The EC legislative proposal for a revised EU emissions trading system (ETS) reform involves the creation of an ETS Innovation Fund (IF). This fund is meant to support low-carbon innovative technologies, including energy storage technologies, by allocating funds to demonstration projects or projects between TRLs 6-9. It will be financed through the earmarking of revenues from the sale ETS allowances.

Energy storage technologies are one of the key enablers of the energy transition, allowing us to integrate increasing shares of renewables and supporting sectoral integration. Thus, EASE believes that the EU should support the demonstration of product innovations focusing on:

  • Both long-term/seasonal storage and short-term/fast responding storage
  • Hybrid energy storage systems, combining two or more storage technologies
  • Technologies supporting sectorial integration and the decarbonisation of the heating, cooling, and transport sectors
02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

19.02.2018 /

All Continental European and Nordic TSOs’ Proposal for a Cost Benefit Analysis Methodology

All Continental European and Nordic TSOs’ Proposal for a Cost Benefit Analysis Methodology

EASE submitted a response to the ENTSO-E Public Consultation on “All Continental European and Nordic TSOs’ proposal for a Cost Benefit Analysis methodology”.

Key messages:

EASE welcomes the efforts by ENTSO-E to propose a methodology suitable for assessing the time period required for FCR providing units or groups with limited energy reservoirs (LER) to remain available during alert state in Continental Europe (CE) and Nordic synchronous areas.

However, we wish to propose several amendments and clarifications, since some aspects of the proposed methodology might lead to strong distortions of the results or to an incomplete CBA:

  • Normal state, pre alert state, alert state and emergency state parameters should be clearly defined to correctly run the CBA: these parameters should be based on the definitions of the System Operation Guideline and if not possible, more clearly defined in the draft CBA methodology. If we support the ENTSO-E proposal to analyse the sizing of LER-FCR reservoirs during the pre-alert and alert states, we also believe that all other states should be analysed in order to correctly size these reservoirs.
  • The FRR behaviour should also be clearly defined in terms of the amount of energy provided by this service and the way this energy is provided in time, since this can have an important effect on FCR provision.
  • There should be more transparency regarding the relevant frequency profiles and historical data used to determine the different scenarios and Monte Carlo sampling assumptions. Incidents older than 10 years should not be taken into consideration because they do not reflect the current electricity system behaviour. The correlation between long lasting frequency deviations and power outages should be taken into account to produce a more precise evaluation.
  • Regarding the economic approach needed to evaluate the cost-benefit impact of the FCR provision, more information should be given on how the costs will be determined.
  • Following the previous remark and given the complexity to assess the reserve cost, we would also suggest to split the proposed methodology into two parts:
    • First, an evaluation of the technical requirements for FCR, taking into account system needs in terms of security and reliability.
    • Then the CBA.

 

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

19.12.2017 /

EMMES - First Edition Released

EMMES – First Edition Released

EASE is pleased to announce a partnership with Delta-ee, which sees EASE publish the first edition of the European Market Monitor on Energy Storage (EMMES). Our analysis indicates that in 2017, the energy storage market has grown 50% compared to the previous year.

Published twice per year, the report offers a comprehensive geographical coverage of energy storage installations in Europe, broken down into 8 regions: Germany, United Kingdom, Italy, France, Iberia, Nordics, Central/Eastern Europe and rest of Europe. Each edition includes an overview of EU policy and future changes, a forecast of the European storage market in 2018 and an overview of the thermal storage market.

The European Market Monitor on Energy Storage covers different energy storage technologies and markets, allowing industry players and other experts to stay up-to-date on the fast-changing energy storage market. The report analyses the energy storage installed base in the residential, commercial & industrial and front-of-meter sectors. EMMES is based upon primary research conducted in collaboration with leading companies and stakeholders, including EASE Members.

 

Watch the webinar

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

11.10.2017 /

EASE-EERA Energy Storage Technology Development Roadmap 2017

EASE-EERA Energy Storage Technology Development Roadmap 2017

The first joint EASE/EERA Technology Development Roadmap on energy storage11 was published in 2013 with the goal of identifying the most pressing technology development priorities for the European energy storage industry. Given the evolution and advancements in the energy storage sector – and, indeed, the energy sector as a whole – over the past several years, EASE and EERA have joined forces once more to draft a significant update to the 2013 roadmap.

The roadmap is a joint effort between the European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) and the Joint Programme on Energy Storage (JP ES) under the European Energy Research Alliance (EERA). Together, EASE and EERA members provide a strong foundation of industrial and research expertise, which allows for a deep and multifaceted insight into the European energy storage sector.

This updated roadmap provides a comprehensive overview of the energy storage technologies being developed in Europe today, with a focus on stationary applications, and identifies the most pressing research, development and demonstration (RD&D) needs in the coming decades. Where applicable, energy storage for electro mobility is also considered in the technology sections. On this basis, the roadmap provides recommendations for research and development (R&D) policies and regulatory changes needed to support the development and large-scale deployment of energy storage technologies. The aim is to inform policymaking for research, innovation, and demonstration in the energy storage sector in order to further strengthen Europe’s research and industrial competitiveness.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

28.07.2017 /

EASE Thermal Storage Position Paper

EASE Thermal Storage Position Paper

EASE, the European Association for Storage of Energy, has published its position paper “Thermal Energy Storage” (TES), which highlights the role of TES in supporting the energy transition.

In this paper, EASE proposes three concrete short-term actions that can further leverage the actions proposed by the Commission in the “Clean Energy for All Europeans” Package:

  • Assess the benefits and (market) potential of thermal energy storage options for prosumers, industry, and communities, among other flexibility solutions; improve efforts to communicate the role and benefits of thermal storage.
  • Implement non-discriminatory market incentives and regulatory frameworks across the EU for flexibility solutions.
  • Support demonstration and deployment projects for (new) integrated solutions which incorporate pre-commercial thermal energy storage options in smart energy systems to reach the required flexibility at lowest system costs.

 

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

15.05.2017 /

EASE Recommendations on Sectoral Integration Through Power-to-Gas/Power-to-Liquid

EASE Recommendations on Sectoral Integration Through Power-to-Gas/Power-to-Liquid

Increasing the power generation from renewable energy sources (RES) and decarbonisation are the main targets of today’s energy policy in Europe. Both Power-to-Gas (PtG) and Power-to-Liquid (PtL) allow using electricity generated from RES to produce Green Hydrogen and other energy carriers. This will help to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by substituting energy from fossil sources.

Since PtG and PtL are able to be produced flexibly, they can provide additional flexibility to the electricity grid and thereby support the integration of intermittent renewable generation as well as the deployment of additional RES installed capacity. Furthermore, PtG and PtL are key technologies for sectoral integration (sector coupling), i.e. improving the link between different energy and economic sectors, thereby increasing the overall efficiency at energy system level while contributing positively to energy security.

EASE has published its recommendations on Sectoral Integration Through Power-to-Gas/Power-to-Liquid (PtG/PtL) that would help in overcoming some key regulatory barriers that are still blocking developments in the PtG and PtL sectors:

  1. Developing a certification system for production pathways of Green Hydrogen and Green Synthetic Fuels.
  2. Developing comprehensive and fair life cycle assessment (LCA) methodologies for assessing GHG emission savings from renewable and low carbon fuels in the overall system to evaluate an adequate remuneration scheme for those savings.
  3. Promoting sectoral integration by reducing the barriers between the different energy and economic systems (mobility, industries, heating, etc.). This includes especially those fees and taxes applied when energy is transferred from one sector to another.
  4. Developing a coherent remuneration system for flexibility services.
  5. Creating a level playing field for Green Hydrogen and green fuels/blending components when used in refineries or during the fuel production process by classifying them as advanced biofuels under the revised Renewable Energy Directive (RED).
  6. Reducing the economic gap by promoting, especially through EU funds, the development of pilot projects.
02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

08.05.2017 /

EASE Position on Energy Storage Deployment Hampered by Grid Charges

EASE Position on Energy Storage Deployment Hampered by Grid Charges

EASE is pleased that the European Commission recognises the value of energy storage as a provider of multiple services to the energy system. As the Commission acknowledges, however, today’s regulatory frameworks across Member States remain fragmented, hampering the creation of an internal energy market. This is illustrated here by highlighting the significant differences in grid charges across countries, to which large-scale pumped hydro storage (PHS) power plants are exposed today, and which will be valid for all energy storage technologies tomorrow.

EASE calls for a coordinated approach to defining grid tariffs for storage that recognises its alleviative effects on grid constraints and grid extension costs, while contributing to reduced curtailment of CO2 free electricity generation.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

08.02.2017 /

EASE Activity Report 2016

EASE Activity Report 2016

Storage has made an indelible mark on the energy sector and is finally being recognised as a key contributor to the EU’s decarbonisation efforts. EASE strives to ensure that energy storage can reach its full potential in terms of supporting the cost-effective integration of variable renewables into the system, building a safe and reliable energy system, and ensuring the active participation of consumers.

Guided by this vision, EASE worked on many different fronts to share information on the role and value of energy storage, achieve a fair market design, and to support energy storage research, development, and deployment.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

31.05.2016 /

Cost Benefit Analysis Methodology (CBA 2.0)

Cost Benefit Analysis Methodology (CBA 2.0)

EASE responded to ENTSO-E’s public consultation on the next European Cost Benefit Analysis Methodology (CBA 2.0).

EASE welcomes the updated CBA 2.0 and the transparent process reflected in this consultation. However, we would like to see the dedication to transparency continue beyond the consultation, extending to the assessment of the Ten-Year Network Development Plan (TYNDP) projects by ENTSO-E regional groups and to the assessment of Projects of Common Interest (PCIs) by EU Regional Groups. The current process for ranking projects seems rather opaque.

EASE welcomes ENTSO-E’s efforts to clearly explain the difficult notions contained in the CBA 2.0 methodology. One potential further improvement would be to explicitly highlight the modelling complexity to give a sense to the non-modelling reader that models can be limiting. We would welcome an annex that includes more descriptions of the current models used in order to further the reader’s understanding of potential limitations and areas of improvement.

Throughout the CBA 2.0 methodology, it is unclear whether the socio-economic welfare (SEW) indicator refers to gross SEW or net SEW (the difference between the socio-economic welfare and the investment costs of the project). EASE supports presenting “net SEW” as the final result.

Regarding the assessment of Energy Storage projects, EASE notes that there are additional indicators for storage, which may render a comparison with conventional transmission projects more difficult.

The modelling of Energy Storage projects in the CBA 2.0 seems to rely on strong simplifications, which may hamper a true assessment of the benefits of some Energy Storage plants.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

30.05.2016 /

A Comprehensive, Integrated Research, Innovation, and Competitiveness Strategy for the Energy Union

A Comprehensive, Integrated Research, Innovation, and Competitiveness Strategy for the Energy Union

EASE submitted a response to DG Research and Innovation’s public consultation on the development of a comprehensive, integrated Research, Innovation, and Competitiveness Strategy for the Energy Union.

Key messages

EASE fully supports the development of an Integrated Energy Union Research, Innovation and Competitiveness Strategy which ensures that research and innovation efforts contribute to making Europe the world’s leader in renewables & low-carbon technologies and solutions while maintaining a competitive industrial base.

One of the most urgent challenges for research and innovation to support the low-carbon transformation is achieving the full deployment of Energy Storage. The development of innovative technologies that increase storage capacity and performance should be encouraged.

Support to research and innovation should be driven by a careful assessment of which technologies provide the largest overall benefits in terms of decarbonising the energy system. Renewable subsidies for mature technologies should be eliminated and non-discriminatory access to technologies which can facilitate the economic growth of renewables (such as Energy Storage) should be facilitated through market-based regulation.

However, support to research and innovation will not in itself lead to the full deployment of available technologies. Research and innovation efforts must be complemented by steps to tear down regulatory barriers to allow for the use of valuable and innovative technologies.

One of the priority measures to ensure that citizens support the transition to a low-carbon economy is to establish electricity retail tariffs that properly reward consumer behaviour and encourage the deployment of small-scale renewable energy sources and Energy Storage technologies.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

13.05.2016 /

EASE Activity Report 2015

EASE Activity Report 2015

2015 was another exciting and successful year for EASE. The European energy system is advancing towards an energy future based on clean, variable and renewable power generation, smarter and more reliable networks, empowered consumers, and competitive, interdependent European energy markets. However, achieving the full potential of Energy Storage is crucial in order to successfully transition to the energy system of the future.

One of EASE’s primary objectives is to foster the creation of a fair market design which adequately remunerates rendered services and allows for a natural market uptake of storage-based solutions. To ensure that both policy and industry recognise and enable the benefits of Energy Storage to flourish to the fullest extent, we need to provide a clear policy framework and to tear down the barriers to Energy Storage. This is why EASE strives to clarify the role of Energy Storage in our energy system and continues to raise awareness of its potential and value.

 

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

01.03.2016 /

EASE Annual Student Award

EASE Annual Student Award

EASE launched in 2016 the EASE Annual Student Award, a competition aimed at recognising outstanding graduate student research in the field of energy storage.

EASE is dedicated to promoting young talents in the field and support students who are keen to contribute to the development and research of energy storage.

The competition is open to all students currently enrolled or that have completed an MSc or PhD programme at an accredited EU university. The thesis which is the basis for the application must focus on an energy storage-related topic.

The selection of the winning student will be performed by the EASE Secretariat and a selected committee of EASE members. The selection procedure is based on the abstracts provided by students in the application form. Students will be judged on the quality of the responses, the research design, and on the relevance of the research topic to the energy storage industry.

The winning student is invited to participate and presents their research during one of the events organised by EASE. This is a valuable opportunity to network with industry leaders in the energy storage sector and to learn more about energy storage technologies, business cases, and policy developments.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

10.02.2016 /

Renewable Energy Directive for the period after 2020

Renewable Energy Directive for the period after 2020

EASE responded to DG Energy’s Public Consultation on the Preparation of a new Renewable Energy Directive for the period after 2020.

Key messages

We believe that providing confidence for investors and producers of renewable energy is important.

EASE calls for subsidies for mature renewable technologies to be eliminated. We also call formarket-based regulation, which allows for a non-discriminatory access to technologies, such as energy storage, facilitating economic growth and the further integration of the renewable energy surces into the energy system.

EU-level support to research and innovation for novel renewable energy technologiesneeds to be assured. Additionally, research efforts should focus on the proper integration of renewables into the grid, relying on technologies such as energy storage and smart grids.

A mechanism needs to be found to properly reward consumer behaviour and to encourage thedeployment of small-scale RES and energy storage technologies.

The storage of heat and cold by use of different storage technologies is key for the success of the EU’s decarbonisation efforts.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

09.12.2015 /

Heat and Cold Storage

Heat and Cold Storage

EASE appreciates the increasing interest in the electrification of heating and cooling and the storage of heat and cold by help of different storage technologies as a means to support the transition of the European energy economy into an energy economy based on sustainability and renewable energy sources (RES) into the energy system .

Heat and cold storage is capable not only of providing flexibility to heating appliances based on heat coming directly from RES such as solar thermal heating but also of supporting the integration of the heat and electricity sector (e.g. by means of smart electric thermal storage (SETS)) and electric heat pumps).

Therefore EASE is convinced that the potential role must be explicitly described and the current regulatory barriers for heat and cold storage must be highlighted in order to allow the full potential of this technology to be made use of. By retrofitting of existing installations such systems could contribute to carbon saving of several million tonnes per year in the EU.

Today major renewable energy sources in the EU are  photovoltaic (PV), wind, hydropower and biomass; transformed into electricity and then utilised in different applications. The share of fluctuating RES like PV and wind is steadily increasing and expected to grow in the next decades. Electric-driven cooling and heating is therefore a major contributor to the decarbonisation of heating and cooling used especially in buildings, when it is based on renewable electricity In combination with storage capabilities. It is also a key technology for the success of decarbonisation efforts by allowing RES electricity to be consumed at times of low electricity demand and used later for heating / cooling purposes, thus allowing a higher penetration of renewable energy onto the grid.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

07.12.2015 /

Renewable Energy Strategy

Renewable Energy Strategy

EASE responded to the public consultation intended to help prepare a communication to inform the EU’s renewable energy policy for the period post 2020. This complements a communication on the Internal Energy Market which is  planned for 2016, and will also help inform the evolution of the EU’s wider energy policies following on from the Energy 2050 Roadmap.

In this report, EASE is proposed to adopt a dynamic communication role as a knowledge pool:

  • by gathering information related to existing commercial or pilot & demonstration
    facilities in EU member states;
  • by facilitating the exchange of information related to operating conditions of existing
    pilot projects

An energy storage road mapping exercise up to 2050 is proposed. It should take into consideration both centralised and decentralised energy storage based on intermediate milestones (2020, 2030 and 2040). The European Electricity Grid Initiative (EEGI) is identified as the primary actor to carry out the task.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

04.12.2015 /

Energy Storage: a Decarbonisation Enabler EASE Paper in the framework of the COP21

Energy Storage: a Decarbonisation Enabler EASE Paper in the framework of the COP21

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is the voice of the energy storage community, actively promoting the use of energy storage in Europe and worldwide.

EASE actively supports the deployment of energy storage as an indispensable instrument within the framework of the European energy and climate policy to deliver services to, and improve the flexibility of, the European energy system. EASE seeks to build a European platform for sharing and disseminating energy storage-related information.
EASE supports the transition towards a sustainable, flexible and stable energy system in Europe.

In December 2015, the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP 21) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) takes place in Paris, France.

The international political response to climate change began at the Rio Earth Summit in 1992, where the ‘Rio Convention’ included the adoption of the UN Framework on Climate Change (UNFCCC). This convention set out a framework for action aimed at stabilising atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHGs) to avoid “dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system.” The UNFCCC which entered into force on 21 March 1994, now has a near-universal membership of 195 parties.

The main objective of the annual Conference of Parties (COP) is to review the Convention’s implementation. The 2015 Paris Climate Conference, will, for the first time in over 20 years of UN negotiations, aim to achieve a legally binding and universal agreement on climate, with the aim of keeping global warming below 2°C.1

In this framework, EASE would like to present the following paper to highlight the importance of Energy Storage as a Decarbonisation Enabler as well as the challenges ahead of us.

 

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

12.10.2015 /

Energy Roadmap 2050

Energy Roadmap 2050

EASE, the European Association for Storage of Energy, represents the voice of the energy storage community, actively engaged in promoting the use of energy storage in Europe and worldwide. EASE strongly supports the Energy Roadmap 2050, particularly for continuously shaping an EU inclusive energy policy and ensuring a smooth transition to a low-carbon energy system.

EASE commends the European Institutions for the work and progress achieved so far and takes the opportunity to provide industry feedback as well as to offer expertise in a constructive dialogue with the European institutions concerned.

The evolution of the energy sector towards a sustainable system will trigger dramatic changes in the patterns of supply and demand. In all scenarios of the Energy Roadmap 2050, the share of renewable energy sources (RES) in gross final energy consumption will achieve at least 55% in 2050. Switching to RES will inevitably lead to a situation in which, from time to time, generation will largely exceed demand or vice versa, with specific concerns on transmission and distribution networks. The growing penetration of RES, in particular non-dispatchable generation such as wind and solar photovoltaic (PV), will increase therefore the need for flexibility in the energy system. Energy storage is especially well suited to respond to this challenge and ensure a continued security of energy supply at any time.

 

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

12.10.2015 /

Network Code on Load-Frequency Control and Reserves

Network Code on Load-Frequency Control and Reserves

EASE, the European Association for Storage of Energy, represents the voice of the energy storage community, actively engaged in promoting the use of energy storage in Europe and worldwide. EASE is convinced that energy storage will provide essential services along the whole energy value chain and so will support the transition towards a secure, competitive and decarbonised energy system in Europe.

Energy storage will play an important role in new market designs, especially with regards to flexibility markets. Specific storage regulation and market mechanisms for flexibility will help to create energy storage markets and will contribute to the development of a competitive energy storage industry in Europe.

EASE submitted its position on the prosed Network Code on Load-Frequency Control and Reserves recommending that technical rules and potential market designs regarding ancillary services (including FCR) should be shaped in such way that, without discrimination, every energy storage technology meeting the actual requirements must be eligible to participate. In the frame of better regulation, it should also be guaranteed that the rules which are in place do not change unless these are proven to be insufficient to guarantee grid stability.

As a consequence, the time period for FCR full activation should be maintained at 15 minutes, except if ENTSO-E is able to demonstrate by a cost-benefit analysis (taking into account the costs of research and demonstration already engaged) and by demonstrating the technical needs, that the extension to 30 minutes would be fundamental for the system reliability.

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.

05.10.2015 /

Market Design

Market Design

EASE responded to DG Energy’s Public Consultation on a new Energy Market Design.

EASE would like to stress that the future governance framework of the Internal Energy Market needs to incorporate regulatory changes creating a separate asset category and rules for electricity energy storage systems. This is necessary due to their dual generation and demand nature. The new asset category should recognise the contribution energy storage systems will make to system security, loss reduction and the provision of other ancillary services on the transmission and distribution networks.

In terms of regulatory oversight and the future role of Agency for the Cooperation of Energy Regulators (ACER), EASE thinks the procurement of ancillary services and the way tariffs for transmission network use of system charges are estimated and applied, must also be made transparent across Europe to provide the right investment signals for providers of flexibility (i.e. energy storage and demand side response operators).

02.04.2020 / MEMBERS

Welcome on board Aarhus University!

The European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) is glad to extend a warm welcome to its newest member Aarhus University – who joined EASE in February 2020.